Ireland on 'inevitable path' to being less competitive, council warns

Ireland on 'inevitable path' to being less competitive, council warns
Minister Heather Humphreys

There is a warning Ireland is on an "inevitable path" to being less competitive.

The National Competitiveness Council has published its annual scorecard report for 2018.

It recognises that the economy is doing well with the jobs market improving, and that the business environment is relatively competitive.

But it says high debt, Ireland's reliance on a small number of exporting companies, and policies which have led to rapid house price inflation and transport congestion are a threat.

Business Minister Heather Humphreys says measures are being taken to improve the country's competitiveness.

"The government is constantly exploring ways in which we can further improve our competitiveness," said Minister Humphreys.

"We are committed to addressing unnecessary high costs where they arise and we have a range of initiatives in areas like labour, property, credit and insurance."

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