Impressionist Oliver Callan laughing all the way to the bank as accumulated profits top €830,000

Impressionist Oliver Callan laughing all the way to the bank as accumulated profits top €830,000

By Gordon Deegan

Satirist and impressionist Oliver Callan is laughing all the way to the bank as accumulated profits at his entertainment company last year topped €830,000.

According to accounts just filed to the Companies Office, Callan’s Catchy Title Ltd enjoyed a bumper 2017 when it recorded profits of €255,906 - a 66% increase on the €153,649 profits recorded in 2016.

The profits last year resulted in the company’s accumulated profits last year increasing from €580,653 to €836,559.

The accounts show that the company had current assets - the bulk of it made up in cash - of €439,673 at the end of December last.

The abridged account show that Callan’s firm also had fixed assets to the value of €477,217.

A journalism graduate from DCU, the Co Monaghan man earned his stripes of his 'Nob Nation' sketch on the Gerry Ryan Show on 2FM and has been producing his highly popular ‘Callan’s Kicks’ show for RTE for more than a decade.

The broadcaster - who also boosts his income with regular live shows, corporate gigs and DVD sales- set up the company in 2012 to capitalise on the lucrative earnings from his comedy.

The multi-award winning impressionist is well known for his Enda Kenny, Leo Varadkar, Donald Trump and Michael D Higgins impressions while Marty Morrissey and Eamon Dunphy also feature in his performances.

The Callan’s Kicks on RTE 1 also spawned a TV version on RTE television which was also a ratings winner.

Callan’s first job was as a newsreader with INN (Independent News Network) where he was paid €70 per shift.

In a Sunday Times interview in 2014, Callan recalled his early years when he said: “I grew up on a farm in Monaghan so I grew up broke. When you grow up with nothing, you don’t expect anything… There was never a great want or sadness that we couldn’t afford to buy things.”

On the most lucrative work he has done, Callan said: “The corporate entertainment market. It doesn’t make more than the other things I do but it’s the least effort required for making money. You’re paid for half-hour sets after dinner.”

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