Hundreds of tech jobs coming to Ireland in three separate announcements

Hundreds of tech jobs coming to Ireland in three separate announcements

Hundreds of new tech jobs are on their way to Ireland amid three separate job announcements today.

More staff are needed by programming experts Xilinx and cloud-computing firm Twilio.

While social media giant Facebook has said it is hiring for its Dublin HQ next year.

The news was confirmed by CEO Mark Zuckerberg who met the Taoiseach in Silicon Valley last night.

The company confirmed its intention to create "hundreds" of new jobs in 2018.

Leo Varadkar is visiting the US West Coast as part of a 3-day trade mission.

Twilio expects to employ 100 employees in marketing, sales, HR, legal, security, finance, support and engineering by the end of 2019 as it expends its EMEA headquarters in Dublin.

Meanwhile, Xilinx has announced its intention to invest $40m (€34.35m) into the expansion of its research, development and engineering operations at its Irish EMEA headquarters.

The company will recruit 75 senior silicon and electronics engineering staff for its regional headquarters in Dublin and for its engineering centre in Cork.

Additionally, 25 new employees will be hired across a broad range of business disciplines supporting the continued growth of Xilinx in Ireland.

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