Half of working parents less ambitious after starting a family, survey shows

Half of working parents less ambitious after starting a family, survey shows

Over half of working parents say that they became less ambitious in their careers after they started a family.

A survey carried out by IrishJobs.ie also found that 78% claim that family responsibilities have dissuaded them from exploring new job opportunities or making a career move.

A similar number (77%) said that they chose not to apply for roles that involved foreign travel due to their family responsibilities.

The survey revealed that many workers find it difficult to maintain a healthy work-life balance.

Almost 60% regularly work outside of standard working hours in an effort to maintain the balance between professional and family commitments.

Almost four in ten (39%) feel that they have been overlooked for career opportunities because of their family responsibilities with 28% saying that they feel their careers have suffered as a result of their inability to attend work events that take place outside of normal working hours.

Half of working parents less ambitious after starting a family, survey shows

One-fifth of those surveyed acknowledged their employer's efforts to accommodate their needs as a working parent as excellent while 45% rated their employers as either good or very good.

Research by IrishJobs.ie found that 31% of workplaces offer parents flexible hours and 14% provide the option of working from home.

"Today’s research however, suggests that these challenges facing working parents extend far beyond their childcare needs and in fact, directly impact their career choices and long-term career ambitions," said Orla Moran, General Manager, IrishJobs.ie.

“As a society currently approaching full employment, it’s important that employers facilitate employees throughout their various life stages and it is encouraging to see that the majority of employers are succeeding in doing so.

“By recognising and accommodating the needs of employees, employers can show them that they are valued within the workplace and help them to reach their full career potential."

Digital Desk

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