Half of all new jobs in last 12 months generated in Dublin

Half of all new jobs in last 12 months generated in Dublin

Dublin generated half (49%) of all new jobs in the last 12 months with the number of people working in the capital increasing by almost 33,000.

According to the latest Labour Force Survey released today by the Central Statistics Office (CSO), the rate of employment growth in Dublin is 66% higher than the figure for the State as a whole.

Employment growth in Dublin over the past 12 months was 5% while the figure for the State overall for the same period was 3%.

The survey has led to calls for further investment in Dublin's public transport infrastructure and housing supply.

Dublin Chamber CEO Mary Rose Burke said that the results are proof that there needs to be serious investment in infrastructure.

"There are an additional 33,000 people working in Dublin since this time last year. That means more people commuting to work on buses, trains, and the Luas," said Ms Burke.

"Further growth opportunities are coming Dublin’s way and the role of our decision makers is to ensure the region is equipped to successfully soak up those opportunities."

With no signs of this growth slowing, Ms Burke said that it is time to get serious about making the investments needed in the capital city region.

"On the transport side, this means delivering projects such as MetroLink and the DART Expansion programme, as well as rolling out BusConnects and investing in better cycling infrastructure.

"The continued growth of Dublin shows the importance also of other projects such as the Water Supply Project.

"Dublin’s existing infrastructure is not adequate to meet present demographic requirements, let alone future needs."

Digital Desk

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