Guilbaud profits pass €390k in ‘best ever year’

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud has two Michelin stars and is targetting a third.

By Gordon Deegan

The country’s most celebrated restaurant, the two Michelin star Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, has had its best ever year and is looking to even better results.

The profits of €390,840 last year were up from the €210,458 it made in 2016.

In an interview, company director Stephane Robin said that “2017 was fabulous and this year, it looks like it will be better again”.

Since the restaurant re-opened in November 2016 after a major revamp, the restaurant has been full boosted by “the local client to the tourist”, said Mr Robin.

The restaurant has been operating since 1981 and has already weathered five downturns. A shareholder, Mr Robin said 2018 was looking to be “our best ever year”.

The restaurant has 42 staff and staff costs last year increased from almost €1.28m to €1.34m. Located in the five-star Merrion Hotel in Dublin, the restaurant secured a second Michelin star in 1996.

On the bid to secure the third Michelin star, Mr Robin said: “Hopefully, we are not too far away from the third Michelin star that we have been chasing for a long time.”

As part of a refurbishment, the restaurant spent €800,000 on a new kitchen where 14 chefs cook for 21 tables.

The cash pile took a hit, however, and fell from €1.47m to €939,638. Mr Robin said around 70% of the restaurant’s customers are tourists in the summer and 70% local during the rest of the year.

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