€230m funding for six SFI Research Centres announced

€230m funding for six SFI Research Centres announced
Two of the centres will be partnered with UCC.

The investment of €230m in six SFI Research Centres has been announced today.

The funding, announced by Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, Heather Humphreys and Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development John Halligan, will directly support approximately 850 researchers.

The centres will focus on integrated photonics, marine renewable energy, gut health and the microbiome, data analytics, advanced pharmaceutical manufacturing and advanced materials.

The investment as part of Project Ireland 2040 was made by the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation through Science Foundation Ireland and is buoyed by industry support with 170 industry partners committing to investing cash and in-kind contributions over the next six years.

This contribution brings the total investment in SFI Research Centres to €460m.

The investment is set to benefit the whole country with third level institutions located across Ireland partnering with the Centres.

The six centres will address the following:

  • APC Microbiome Ireland, led by University College Cork
  • The MaREI Centre, led by University College Cork
  • AMBER, the SFI Research Centre for Advanced Materials and Bioengineering Research, led by Trinity College Dublin
  • The Insight Centre for Data Analytics, co-led by NUI Galway, Dublin City University, University College Cork and University College Dublin
  • IPIC, the Irish Photonic Integration Centre, led by Tyndall National Institute
  • SSPC, the SFI Research Centre for Pharmaceuticals, led by University of Limerick
  • Commenting on the announcement, Minister Humphreys said: “This investment by my Department in the six SFI Research Centres is part of the Government’s strategy to prepare now for tomorrow’s world, through plans like Future Jobs Ireland and Project Ireland 2040.

    The work that has been done to date has positioned Ireland as a world leader in research, further strengthening our global credibility across a number of different sectors.

    "The economic impact of this research is clear, not only through direct and in-direct employment levels, but also through increased foreign direct investment.

    "Our Research Centres not only act as magnets to attract and retain investment; they also encourage companies, both Irish and foreign-owned, to develop their R&D activities here. This will continue to benefit Ireland and the world for years to come.”

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