Enterprise Ireland approve €74m in supports as concerns grow that hard Brexit will put up to 25,000 Irish jobs in jeopardy

Up to 25,000 jobs here could be affected by a ‘hard Brexit’, according to Enterprise Ireland.

The State body has identified 600 Irish companies most vulnerable to the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Enterprise Ireland is celebrating its best ever year as it now has 215,207 people working in companies it supports right across the country.

Julie Sinnamon, CEO of Enterprise Ireland. Pic: Shane O'Neill

The State agency is keen to point out that 60% of the nearly 19,000 new jobs created last year were outside Dublin.

However, Brexit is a big fear for many of these firms and Enterprise Ireland has identified 600 companies it says are most vulnerable to the UK leaving the EU.

Up to €74m in funding has been given to firms as they get ready for whatever happens come March 29.

Julie Sinnamon, Chief Executive of Enterprise Ireland, said thousands of jobs would be impacted by a no-deal Brexit.

Ms Sinnamon said: "Almost 25,000 jobs associated with us, it really depends on what the end deal is as to what the level of exposure would be."

She hopes setting up offices in Germany, the USA and Australia could open new markets post Brexit.


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