Dublin disposable incomes 18% higher than average as CSO release county-by-county breakdown

Dublin disposable incomes 18% higher than average as CSO release county-by-county breakdown

People living in Dublin have a disposable income that's over 18% higher than the State average, according to CSO figures.

Based on 2016 data, the average Dublin-resident had after-tax income of €24,431, 18.4% higher than the nationwide figure of €20,638.

The disposable income gap between Dublin and the State had been 8% in 2010 but is set to grow to 22.1% in 2017, according to preliminary CSO estimates.

Those estimates forecast the disposable income figure growing to €26,122 in Dublin for 2017, compared to the estimated State average of €21,397.

The only other counties to exceed the State average in 2016 were Limerick (€21,979) and Kildare (€20,860).

Dublin disposable incomes 18% higher than average as CSO release county-by-county breakdown

Wicklow (€20,174), Cork (€20,125) and Waterford (€20,101) also exceed a per person disposable income of €20,000.

The poorest regions are the border counties with €17,370 disposable income per person (15.8% below the State average) and the midlands, at €17,717 (14.1% below the State average). None of the nine counties that make up those regions have ranked above average in the past decade.

Donegal continues to be the county with the lowest disposable income per person, at €15,892, a position it has maintained throughout the 2007-2016 period covered by these figures.

Offaly (€17,039) and Roscommon (€17,145) are the next lowest.

The report also revealed that the State's average disposable income figure has reached its highest level since 2009, with Dublin regional incomes increasing by €982 (4.2%) in 2016 while border incomes, the lowest in Ireland, increased by €538 (3.2%).

Average disposable income by county in 2016

Carlow: €19,943

Cavan: €18,102

Clare: €18,145

Cork: €20,125

Donegal: €15,892

Dublin: €24,431

Galway: €19,046

Kerry: €18,567

Kildare: €20,860

Kilkenny: €18,928

Laois: €17,684

Leitrim: €18,738

Limerick: €21,979

Longford: €17,542

Louth: €18,359

Mayo: €17,650

Meath: €19,670

Monaghan: €17,639

Offaly: €17,039

Roscommon: €17,145

Sligo: €19,277

Tipperary: €19,880

Waterford: €20,101

Westmeath: €18,430

Wexford: €18,921

Wicklow: €20,174

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