Dublin Airport's new runway 'will bring 7,000 new jobs', says DAA

Dublin Airport's new runway 'will bring 7,000 new jobs', says DAA

Seven thousand new jobs are to be created at Dublin Airport when a new runway is completed in 2020.

The Dublin Airport Authority (DAA) is to build the new runway, which will be 1.6 kms north of the existing and main runway at Dublin Airport.

It will cost €320m and is expected to be delivered in 2020. Some 1,200 jobs will be supported during the construction phase, which is expected to begin in 2017.

Dublin Airport received planning permission in August 2007 for the new runway, but the plans were put on hold due to the recession.

Chief executive of the DAA Kevin Toland said the new runway was critical - not just for Dublin airport, but for the overall development of the economy.

"This will create 1,200 jobs during the construction period, with 7,000 at the end of it," he said.

"We're growing very quickly, with growth three times faster than the rest of the EU. With that growth comes the challenge of bringing on capacity for the future."

The DAA operates Dublin and Cork airports.

Dublin Airport saw a 15% rise in passenger numbers last year, growing to more than 25 million passengers.

More in this Section

Aer Lingus sees drop in business travel over coronavirusAer Lingus sees drop in business travel over coronavirus

Irish staff seek legal advice on coronavirusIrish staff seek legal advice on coronavirus

Irish tourist chiefs on high alert as European events cancelledIrish tourist chiefs on high alert as European events cancelled

DHL scraps Ford electric delivery vanDHL scraps Ford electric delivery van


Lifestyle

Spring has sprung and a new Munster festival promises to celebrate its arrival with gusto, says Eve Kelliher.Spring has sprung: Munster festival promises to celebrate with gusto

The spotlight will fall on two Munster architects in a new showcase this year.Munster architects poised to build on their strengths

Prepare to fall for leather, whatever the weather, says Annmarie O'Connor.Trend of the week: It's always leather weather

The starting point for Michael West’s new play, in this joint production by Corn Exchange and the Abbey, is an alternative, though highly familiar, 1970s Ireland. You know, elections every few weeks, bad suits, wide ties, and a seedy nexus of politics and property development.Theatre Review: The Fall of the Second Republic at Abbey Theatre, Dublin

More From The Irish Examiner