Danish company prepares to confront cartoon questions

The company hurt worst by the boycott in many Muslim countries of Danish products by consumers angered over the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed today said it hoped to confront the issue at a trade fair in Dubai.

Arla Foods, one of Europe’s largest dairy companies, estimates it has been losing €1.45m each day of the boycott, which started on January 26 in Saudi Arabia and has since spread to about 20 nations.

“We don’t expect our participation in the exhibition to have an impact on the boycott, which is the consumers’ choice,” said Arla regional director Jan Pedersen.

“But we will have some valuable discussions with our business contacts. A face-to-face dialogue is extremely important in the Middle East and cannot be substituted by a phone call.”

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