Coveney: American market for Irish beef 'a huge prize'

Coveney: American market for Irish beef 'a huge prize'

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Simon Coveney has said the opening of the American market to Irish beef is "a huge prize" for the industry here.

Irish beef is back on the menu in the US for the first time since a ban was introduced over fears of BSE 16 years ago.

After a two-year campaign by government officials and agriculture chiefs, Ireland has become the first state in the European Union to achieve the lucrative status for grass-fed cattle – “green beef” as it is known.

Minister Coveney said the US is a much more exciting market than it was 16 years ago and is now the highest value in world for beef farmers.

Sales into the American market from Ireland are estimated to run from €50m-€100m this year, with the potential for more, he said.

“This US market is a huge prize given the size of the market and the demand we know exists there for premium grass-fed beef,” Mr Coveney said.

“We now have first-mover advantage as a result of being the first EU member state to gain entry. There is also the large Irish-American community, which will be a key target of our promotional efforts for Irish beef now.”

As part of the drive to promote Irish beef, a dedicated website aimed at American consumers and buyers, highlighting the quality of the meat, is to be set up in coming weeks.

The agreement to reopen the market was reached following two years of talks with US officials and a successful inspection of Ireland’s beef production systems last July.

Beef from the EU has been banned in the US for more than 15 years over fears of quality following the BSE scare. The ban was only formally lifted in March last year.

Mr Coveney added: “This announcement by the US is a huge endorsement of Irish beef and our production and regulatory systems. It complements the other market access outlets we have secured in the last two years, all of which are a key element of our Food Harvest 2020 strategy to expand the overseas opportunity for Irish beef.

“It’s clear that diversifying our international beef markets as an exporting country is key to the long-term sustainability of our beef sector.”

Under the agreement with Washington, Irish authorities will be required to approve individual beef plants to export meat to the US.

President of the Irish Farmers' Association Eddie Downey welcomed the development.

“This is a positive development and its significance will be judged by farmers securing improved beef prices from the marketplace in 2015,” he said.

The farming chief said the major increase in US beef prices, up by one euro per kilo in the last year and now at €4.70-€4.80 per kilo, must present a real opportunity for Irish grass-based beef exports.

More in this Section

Ireland's steadily growing reputation as a global leader in internet securityIreland's steadily growing reputation as a global leader in internet security

Thousands of jobs at risk in motor industry due to Brexit and tax hikesThousands of jobs at risk in motor industry due to Brexit and tax hikes

No sign of UK households stockpiling ahead of Brexit, figures suggestNo sign of UK households stockpiling ahead of Brexit, figures suggest

ABP food group: 355 workers let go from Cahir plant 'as a direct result of blockade'ABP food group: 355 workers let go from Cahir plant 'as a direct result of blockade'


Lifestyle

It will take you out of your beauty comfort zone, but is remarkably easy to pull off.London Fashion Week: This top make-up artist wants you to ditch your cat-eye for a ‘blue fade’

Columnist and trained counsellor Fiona Caine advises a 20-something man who isn’t having any luck meeting women in bars and clubs.Ask a counsellor: ‘Neither me or my mates have had a date for years – what are we doing wrong?’

As Aussie beer and cider brand Gayle launches in the UK, Abi Jackson finds out more from co-founder Virginia Buckworth.‘Brewed with love’: How new Aussie brand Gayle is putting ‘gay ale’ on the world drinks map

Pumpkins and other squash are such a distinctive harvest vegetable that they are used as symbols for many of the season’s festivals.Michelle Darmody: Pumpkin bakes

More From The Irish Examiner