Cameron reaffirms tax cuts pledge

Cameron reaffirms tax cuts pledge

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has insisted there is an economic, moral and practical case for tax cuts following the general election, as he used the latest in a series of campaign speeches to highlight Conservative promises to cut £7bn from income tax.

But the UK Prime Minister did not spell out how he would pay for the tax giveaway, saying only that the party had a track record of lowering income tax at the same time as reducing Government spending.

And he confirmed plans for a further £30bn spending cuts if Tories win the May 7 poll, including £13bn from Whitehall department spending and £12bn from welfare.

Mr Cameron said: “After the security of a job, the next best thing we can do is to cut people’s taxes and let them keep more of their own money to spend as they choose. That’s our aim.”

He restated promises made at last year’s Conservative conference to raise the personal allowance threshold below which workers pay no income tax to £12,500 and to increase to £50,000 the level at which the 40p tax rate kicks in.

In response to critics who have said that the pledges – together worth around £7bn – are unfunded, Cameron said: “How are we able to make them? Because we have a strong economy and because people can see the record of this Government.

“Under this Government, we’ve cut the deficit. We’ve had to make difficult decisions on spending to do that. But we have cut income tax at the same time and we can do it again in the next Parliament.”

Mr Cameron said May’s election offered a choice between “whether we have a government with competence, with grip, with a long-term economic plan, or whether we have the chaos of Ed Miliband in Downing Street and all that would mean”.

But following speculation at the weekend about the SNP propping up a minority Labour administration, the PM added: “If there was anyone who thought the worst possible outcome of the election was an Ed Miliband-led Labour government, actually I can now tell you something that would be even worse, and that is Ed Miliband in Downing Street, supported by the Scottish National Party who want to break up our United Kingdom. The battle of this election has become even more important.”

More in this Section

Ryanair shareholders lash out at Michael O’Leary pay plansRyanair shareholders lash out at Michael O’Leary pay plans

Bank warns of prolonged Brexit uncertainty as interest rates heldBank warns of prolonged Brexit uncertainty as interest rates held

Google teams up with UK regional publisher in effort to save local newsGoogle teams up with UK regional publisher in effort to save local news

Next sees price cuts in no-deal Brexit as half-year profits riseNext sees price cuts in no-deal Brexit as half-year profits rise


Lifestyle

When starting out as a comedian, Cork man Andrew Ryan decided to go to straight to London, sidestepping the usual starting ground of Irish clubs and pubs.Cork comedian Andrew Ryan is 'a cross between Ardal O’Hanlon and Ed Byrne'

Paul McLauchlan has the lowdown from London Fashion Week. Here’s all you need to know about next season.London Fashion Week: How you’ll dress for the next decade

Aileen Lee sits down with artist Valerie Walsh Jolley.Portrait of an artist: Meet Valerie Walsh Jolley

Kya deLongchamps meets the man who is opening a new chapter on his native FermoyVintage View: Opening a new chapter on Fermoy's story

More From The Irish Examiner