Busy weekend for Cork Airport as figures show 11% rise in passengers

Busy weekend for Cork Airport as figures show 11% rise in passengers

Cork Airport passenger figures have soared by 11% in the first three months of this year.

The airport will be a hive of activity this Easter holiday weekend, with 70,000 passengers due to pass through. Tomorrow (Holy Thursday) is expected to be a particularly busy day for departures and arrivals.

"We are delighted that this Easter break will see such huge passenger numbers going through our terminal," said Managing Director Niall MacCarthy in a statement.

"Earlier this week, the Irish Aviation Authority released positive figures showing the number of flights through Cork Airport was up 9% during the first quarter of 2019, the largest increase of all Irish airports.

"It’s been an incredibly positive start to the year, for what will be our fourth year of consecutive growth, and we are committed to continuing this throughout 2019 and beyond."

The Airport expects its annual passenger figures to grow to 2.6m by the year's end.

Over 50 routes are on offer this year, including the new Aer Lingus service to Nice and SWISS's summer flights to Zurich, both of which commenced today.

Ryanair’s new twice-weekly routes to Poznań, Budapest, and Malta all kicked off earlier this month.

Dublin Airport is also expecting a record-breaking Easter weekend, with the Canaries and Spanish coastal resorts the destinations of choice for tourists.

390,000 passengers are expected to travel through the airport this weekend, an increase of 6%.

Monday is expected to be their busiest day, with over 102,000 passengers due to arrive or depart.

"Over 2,600 flights are expected to arrive and depart this Easter Bank Holiday weekend," said Dublin Airport spokesperson Siobhán O’Donnell.

"The Canary Islands and Spanish coastal resorts are the most popular destinations for passengers in search of sunshine this Easter and city breaks are also high on the agenda for those heading away."

More than 6.5m passengers have travelled through Dublin Airport between January and March, representing an 8% increase. That's an extra 460,000 passengers compared to the same period last year.

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