Biomarin expands to 2,600 staff globally, and over 500 in Ireland

Biomarin expands to 2,600 staff globally, and over 500 in Ireland
Avril Daly, chair of Rare Diseases Ireland; An Tanaiste, Simon Coveney TD; Michael O'Donnell, BioMarin; and Jim Lennertz, BioMarin; at the opening in Dublin of BioMarin's new Commercial Headquarters for Europe, Middle East and Africa.

Biotech firm BioMarin Pharmaceutical has grown to over 2,600 staff globally and over 500 in Ireland with the opening of its new offices in Dublin.

A global leader in therapies for rare genetic diseases, BioMarin’s new Dublin hub will service its growing operations across EU, the Middle East and Africa (EUMEA).

The new offices in Earlsfort Terrace were formally opened by An Tánaiste, Minister for Foreign Affairs & Trade, Simon Coveney. The opening follows last year’s €38m expansion of its manufacturing facility in Cork, which is also currently in progress.

Jim Lennertz, senior VP for EUMEA commercial operations, BioMarin, said:

“We are investing in our future operations in Ireland to support rising demand for our rare disease therapies.

We benefit from the exceptional pool of life sciences talent and expertise in Ireland, which means we can recruit the right people at a time when the company has exciting innovations in the pipeline and continues to drive strong growth in the EUMEA region.

For over two decades, BioMarin has pioneered breakthrough treatments for rare genetic diseases.

Many of these conditions affect children; some diseases are so uncommon that the entire patient population is as few as 1,000 people worldwide.

Rare diseases have a high level of unmet need; 95% of rare diseases lack even a single treatment option.

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