9% increase in job vacancies as economy continues to grow

9% increase in job vacancies as economy continues to grow

There was a 9% increase in job vacancies nationwide in the first three months of this year compared to the same period last year, a new report shows.

According to IrishJobs.ie, job vacancies in the first quarter of 2018 rose by 17% on the previous quarter.

The report also revealed vacancy growth across multiple sectors as there were quarterly increases in job vacancies in 22 of the 26 of sectors analysed.

There were annual increases in high-tech sectors like science, pharmaceuticals and food (+23%), and medical professionals and healthcare (+15%); and quarterly increases in accountancy and finance (+26%) and banking, financial services and insurance (+11%).

However, some sectors experienced decreases in job vacancies. Vacancies in sales, for example, fell by 19% in Q1 2018 compared to the same period last year, while marketing roles fell by 11%.

According to the report, the 17% quarterly increase in job vacancies at national level is reflected in an increase in vacancies across all 26 counties versus the previous quarter.

The strongest quarter-on-quarter growth was recorded in Longford (85%). Other more traditionally economically peripheral counties including Leitrim (48%), Kerry (48%) and Sligo (43%) each recorded significant gains, if from a relatively low baseline.

In addition, counties with major urban concentrations, including Dublin (13%), Cork (12%), Limerick (19%) and Galway (26%) continue to see consistent growth in vacancies across the board.

Orla Moran, General Manager of IrishJobs.ie, said: “The Irish economy is in robust health. According to estimates by the CSO, in 2017, we were the fastest-growing economy in the EU for the fourth consecutive year. Unemployment is low and is set to drop further in 2019.

Although the Irish economy is in a strong position, businesses must contend with continued political uncertainty. In the UK, Brexit continues.

"A transition agreement means the UK will remain a limited member of the bloc until 2020. A solution to the Border, however, remains elusive.

"To ensure uninterrupted revenue streams and job creation, Irish businesses must prepare for a scenario where trading with Great Britain—and the North—becomes restricted and more expensive."

- Digital Desk

More in this Section

Fears of new banking charges scandal as interest may have been overcharged on insurance productsFears of new banking charges scandal as interest may have been overcharged on insurance products

Corporate tax windfalls remain a puzzleCorporate tax windfalls remain a puzzle

Expansion costs hit profits at three time Oscar-nominated Cartoon Saloon animation studiosExpansion costs hit profits at three time Oscar-nominated Cartoon Saloon animation studios

Tariff and quota-free trade between Ireland and Britain must remain – VaradkarTariff and quota-free trade between Ireland and Britain must remain – Varadkar


Lifestyle

My children are now at an age where they are beginning to forge friendships outside of the parameters of their school.Lindsay Woods: 'My daughter has a friend... She’s the C C to her Hillary'

More From The Irish Examiner