70 Companies have invested in Ireland as a result of Brexit, says IDA Ireland

Martin Shanahan, CEO of IDA Ireland

Ireland’s Foreign Investment Agency, IDA Ireland has claimed that over 5,000 jobs will be coming to Ireland as 70 companies have invested her since the Brexit referendum.

Martin Shanahan, CEO of IDA Ireland, provided the new figures today speaking at the Harvard Club in New York.

“These updated figures are another reminder of how our European Union membership and stable pro-enterprise policies are appealing to investors who are looking for certainty,” said Mr Shanahan at a conference hosted by Irish Central called ‘Understanding Brexit’.

“For US companies with ambitions to be global players, Ireland is a natural fit for their international operations.”

Dublin remains the most popular choice for financial services firms to relocate post-Brexit according to EY’s Brexit Tracker.

To date in Ireland companies that have announced investments connected to Brexit include: Barclays, Morgan Stanley, TD Securities, Wasdell, Delphi /Aptiv, Simmons & Simmons, S&P Global, Thomson Reuters, Equilend and Coinbase, according to IDA Ireland.

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