100 research roles for Tyndall in 'disruptive tech'

100 research roles for Tyndall in 'disruptive tech'
Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys with Tyndall team members Marco Belcastro, Brendan O'Flynn and Tyndall CEO Prof William Scanlan. Picture: Daragh Mc Sweeney/Provision

Up to 100 new research posts will be created at Tyndall National Institute in Cork as part of a €20m investment into so-called "disruptive technologies".

Tyndall said recent successes in securing multi-million euro funding from EU programmes and international industry had allowed it to create the research positions.

It is leading three projects worth more than €14m in connected health, where technology allows remote healthcare; photonics manufacturing, which concerns light manipulation and harnessing; and blockchain energy trading, which involves digital transaction storage for energy and commodity trading firms. Tyndall is also a partner in a medtech project.

Disruptive technology describes upending existing systems through innovation, or creating a whole new industry through never before seen technology.

The €20m Tyndall investment is part of the Government's €500m Disruptive Technologies Innovation Fund (DTIF) which forms part of the €116 Project 2040 plan.

Business Minister Heather Humphreys said the DTIF is a "key part" of Project 2040.

"It is one of the first funds of its kind in the world and it will ensure that Ireland is at the cutting edge in terms of developing new technologies which will change the way we live and work in the future.

The fact that four of the 27 successful projects have Tyndall involvement is a clear indication of the quality, novelty and industry-relevance of the research conducted at Tyndall.

Cork Chamber director of public affairs Thomas Mc Hugh said Tyndall "exemplifies the quality of innovation taking place in Cork".

"Today’s announcement is a validation of both the ongoing work and future vision of the institute. The momentum in Cork is strong at present, driven by the work of businesses and institutions such as the Tyndall.

"We need to ensure that Government continues in its commitments to Cork in Ireland 2040 and that these plans move from strategy to shovel ready projects without delay. We are in a very exciting phase of growth in Cork with new developments taking shape every day and with exciting new plans in the pipeline. The opportunity for Cork is now and the support for Tyndall through the DTIF is both timely and well deserved.”

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