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Millions spent on diabetes — but no strategy in place

currency

By Catherine Shanahan
IRELAND spends hundreds of millions of euro annually treating preventable complications in diabetes patients, but has no national strategy to tackle the growing health issue.

A comparison of 15 EU countries shows Ireland has the fourth-highest spend on direct medical intervention for diabetes care despite having the lowest prevalence rate of diabetes in adults (3.4%).

The figures, contained in an audit of diabetes rates and care in all 25 EU states, estimates Ireland spends up to 10% of its €11 billion health budget each year on diabetes and related health issues, which include cardiovascular disease, blindness, lower limb amputation and renal failure.

Yet the Netherlands where adult prevalence rates are similar to Ireland (3.7%) has the lowest healthcare diabetes costs, spending just 2.5 % of its total healthcare budget on the illness.

Diabetes Federation of Ireland (DFI) chief executive Kieran O'Leary said the lack of a properly resourced framework to tackle diabetes means the Government is spending hundreds of millions on treating largely manageable complications.

The DFI said hospital costs could be reduced significantly if the patient was treated mainly in the community by his GP. This would require proper detection and prevention programmes.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health said a plan to tackle diabetes had been drawn up by a working group headed up by the department's chief medical officer. It is with the HSE for consideration and is due for publication shortly. Last week the HSE announced €1.2m funding this year for the management of chronic illness including diabetes.

 

Millions spent on diabetes — but no strategy in place

currency

By Catherine Shanahan
IRELAND spends hundreds of millions of euro annually treating preventable complications in diabetes patients, but has no national strategy to tackle the growing health issue.

A comparison of 15 EU countries shows Ireland has the fourth-highest spend on direct medical intervention for diabetes care despite having the lowest prevalence rate of diabetes in adults (3.4%).

The figures, contained in an audit of diabetes rates and care in all 25 EU states, estimates Ireland spends up to 10% of its €11 billion health budget each year on diabetes and related health issues, which include cardiovascular disease, blindness, lower limb amputation and renal failure.

Yet the Netherlands where adult prevalence rates are similar to Ireland (3.7%) has the lowest healthcare diabetes costs, spending just 2.5 % of its total healthcare budget on the illness.

Diabetes Federation of Ireland (DFI) chief executive Kieran O'Leary said the lack of a properly resourced framework to tackle diabetes means the Government is spending hundreds of millions on treating largely manageable complications.

The DFI said hospital costs could be reduced significantly if the patient was treated mainly in the community by his GP. This would require proper detection and prevention programmes.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health said a plan to tackle diabetes had been drawn up by a working group headed up by the department's chief medical officer. It is with the HSE for consideration and is due for publication shortly. Last week the HSE announced €1.2m funding this year for the management of chronic illness including diabetes.

 

Millions spent on diabetes — but no strategy in place

currency

By Catherine Shanahan
IRELAND spends hundreds of millions of euro annually treating preventable complications in diabetes patients, but has no national strategy to tackle the growing health issue.

A comparison of 15 EU countries shows Ireland has the fourth-highest spend on direct medical intervention for diabetes care despite having the lowest prevalence rate of diabetes in adults (3.4%).

The figures, contained in an audit of diabetes rates and care in all 25 EU states, estimates Ireland spends up to 10% of its €11 billion health budget each year on diabetes and related health issues, which include cardiovascular disease, blindness, lower limb amputation and renal failure.

Yet the Netherlands where adult prevalence rates are similar to Ireland (3.7%) has the lowest healthcare diabetes costs, spending just 2.5 % of its total healthcare budget on the illness.

Diabetes Federation of Ireland (DFI) chief executive Kieran O'Leary said the lack of a properly resourced framework to tackle diabetes means the Government is spending hundreds of millions on treating largely manageable complications.

The DFI said hospital costs could be reduced significantly if the patient was treated mainly in the community by his GP. This would require proper detection and prevention programmes.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health said a plan to tackle diabetes had been drawn up by a working group headed up by the department's chief medical officer. It is with the HSE for consideration and is due for publication shortly. Last week the HSE announced €1.2m funding this year for the management of chronic illness including diabetes.

 

Millions spent on diabetes — but no strategy in place

currency

By Catherine Shanahan
IRELAND spends hundreds of millions of euro annually treating preventable complications in diabetes patients, but has no national strategy to tackle the growing health issue.

A comparison of 15 EU countries shows Ireland has the fourth-highest spend on direct medical intervention for diabetes care despite having the lowest prevalence rate of diabetes in adults (3.4%).

The figures, contained in an audit of diabetes rates and care in all 25 EU states, estimates Ireland spends up to 10% of its €11 billion health budget each year on diabetes and related health issues, which include cardiovascular disease, blindness, lower limb amputation and renal failure.

Yet the Netherlands where adult prevalence rates are similar to Ireland (3.7%) has the lowest healthcare diabetes costs, spending just 2.5 % of its total healthcare budget on the illness.

Diabetes Federation of Ireland (DFI) chief executive Kieran O'Leary said the lack of a properly resourced framework to tackle diabetes means the Government is spending hundreds of millions on treating largely manageable complications.

The DFI said hospital costs could be reduced significantly if the patient was treated mainly in the community by his GP. This would require proper detection and prevention programmes.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health said a plan to tackle diabetes had been drawn up by a working group headed up by the department's chief medical officer. It is with the HSE for consideration and is due for publication shortly. Last week the HSE announced €1.2m funding this year for the management of chronic illness including diabetes.

 

Millions spent on diabetes — but no strategy in place

currency

By Catherine Shanahan
IRELAND spends hundreds of millions of euro annually treating preventable complications in diabetes patients, but has no national strategy to tackle the growing health issue.

A comparison of 15 EU countries shows Ireland has the fourth-highest spend on direct medical intervention for diabetes care despite having the lowest prevalence rate of diabetes in adults (3.4%).

The figures, contained in an audit of diabetes rates and care in all 25 EU states, estimates Ireland spends up to 10% of its €11 billion health budget each year on diabetes and related health issues, which include cardiovascular disease, blindness, lower limb amputation and renal failure.

Yet the Netherlands where adult prevalence rates are similar to Ireland (3.7%) has the lowest healthcare diabetes costs, spending just 2.5 % of its total healthcare budget on the illness.

Diabetes Federation of Ireland (DFI) chief executive Kieran O'Leary said the lack of a properly resourced framework to tackle diabetes means the Government is spending hundreds of millions on treating largely manageable complications.

The DFI said hospital costs could be reduced significantly if the patient was treated mainly in the community by his GP. This would require proper detection and prevention programmes.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health said a plan to tackle diabetes had been drawn up by a working group headed up by the department's chief medical officer. It is with the HSE for consideration and is due for publication shortly. Last week the HSE announced €1.2m funding this year for the management of chronic illness including diabetes.