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Latvia police may help gardaí tackle immigrant crime

Garda

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
LATVIA may send police to Ireland to help sort out the high level of crime, including murders, gang warfare and drunk driving among Latvians living in the country.

Foreign Minister Dermot Ahern told his Latvian counterpart, Artis Pabriks, yesterday that the behaviour of some of his fellow countrymen in Ireland was unacceptable.

There are up to 50,000 Latvians living in Ireland among the 165,000 workers from the EU’s new members at present.

A disproportionate number of them have been implicated in crime ranging from murders to extortion and gang warfare among Latvian workers.

The gardaí say about a fifth of road deaths in the last year on Irish roads were Eastern Europeans and a large number of these were from Latvia.

Mr Ahern said he explained to Mr Pabriks yesterday in Brussels, where they were both attending an EU meeting, that to Irish people and young people in particular drink driving is unacceptable and frowned on by the vast majority.

"But unfortunately the habits of the new immigrants are not in keeping with this and have resulted in some very serious car accidents," he said.

He also spoke to him about the number of murders involving some of his countrymen, including the latest in Dublin some weeks ago. "We also discussed the gang warfare," he said.

He added that he told him that while over half the 165,000 immigrants from the new member states are Polish, they cause very few problems. "His citizens account for a disproportionate amount of trouble," Mr

Ahern added.

Mr Pabriks suggested his government might send some police to Ireland to talk to the Latvian community, a move Mr Ahern said he would welcome.

Mr Ahern first raised the issue with Mr Pabriks when he was in Riga recently speaking on what the new EU member could learn from Ireland’s experience.

"I told him he should be more conscious of the very different type of issue we have to deal with in relation to some of his countrymen and women, especially their driving habits, and I suggested to him that he might come over to Ireland and get a brief from his people in Dublin."

 

Latvia police may help gardaí tackle immigrant crime

Garda

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
LATVIA may send police to Ireland to help sort out the high level of crime, including murders, gang warfare and drunk driving among Latvians living in the country.

Foreign Minister Dermot Ahern told his Latvian counterpart, Artis Pabriks, yesterday that the behaviour of some of his fellow countrymen in Ireland was unacceptable.

There are up to 50,000 Latvians living in Ireland among the 165,000 workers from the EU’s new members at present.

A disproportionate number of them have been implicated in crime ranging from murders to extortion and gang warfare among Latvian workers.

The gardaí say about a fifth of road deaths in the last year on Irish roads were Eastern Europeans and a large number of these were from Latvia.

Mr Ahern said he explained to Mr Pabriks yesterday in Brussels, where they were both attending an EU meeting, that to Irish people and young people in particular drink driving is unacceptable and frowned on by the vast majority.

"But unfortunately the habits of the new immigrants are not in keeping with this and have resulted in some very serious car accidents," he said.

He also spoke to him about the number of murders involving some of his countrymen, including the latest in Dublin some weeks ago. "We also discussed the gang warfare," he said.

He added that he told him that while over half the 165,000 immigrants from the new member states are Polish, they cause very few problems. "His citizens account for a disproportionate amount of trouble," Mr

Ahern added.

Mr Pabriks suggested his government might send some police to Ireland to talk to the Latvian community, a move Mr Ahern said he would welcome.

Mr Ahern first raised the issue with Mr Pabriks when he was in Riga recently speaking on what the new EU member could learn from Ireland’s experience.

"I told him he should be more conscious of the very different type of issue we have to deal with in relation to some of his countrymen and women, especially their driving habits, and I suggested to him that he might come over to Ireland and get a brief from his people in Dublin."

 

Latvia police may help gardaí tackle immigrant crime

Garda

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
LATVIA may send police to Ireland to help sort out the high level of crime, including murders, gang warfare and drunk driving among Latvians living in the country.

Foreign Minister Dermot Ahern told his Latvian counterpart, Artis Pabriks, yesterday that the behaviour of some of his fellow countrymen in Ireland was unacceptable.

There are up to 50,000 Latvians living in Ireland among the 165,000 workers from the EU’s new members at present.

A disproportionate number of them have been implicated in crime ranging from murders to extortion and gang warfare among Latvian workers.

The gardaí say about a fifth of road deaths in the last year on Irish roads were Eastern Europeans and a large number of these were from Latvia.

Mr Ahern said he explained to Mr Pabriks yesterday in Brussels, where they were both attending an EU meeting, that to Irish people and young people in particular drink driving is unacceptable and frowned on by the vast majority.

"But unfortunately the habits of the new immigrants are not in keeping with this and have resulted in some very serious car accidents," he said.

He also spoke to him about the number of murders involving some of his countrymen, including the latest in Dublin some weeks ago. "We also discussed the gang warfare," he said.

He added that he told him that while over half the 165,000 immigrants from the new member states are Polish, they cause very few problems. "His citizens account for a disproportionate amount of trouble," Mr

Ahern added.

Mr Pabriks suggested his government might send some police to Ireland to talk to the Latvian community, a move Mr Ahern said he would welcome.

Mr Ahern first raised the issue with Mr Pabriks when he was in Riga recently speaking on what the new EU member could learn from Ireland’s experience.

"I told him he should be more conscious of the very different type of issue we have to deal with in relation to some of his countrymen and women, especially their driving habits, and I suggested to him that he might come over to Ireland and get a brief from his people in Dublin."

 

Latvia police may help gardaí tackle immigrant crime

Garda

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
LATVIA may send police to Ireland to help sort out the high level of crime, including murders, gang warfare and drunk driving among Latvians living in the country.

Foreign Minister Dermot Ahern told his Latvian counterpart, Artis Pabriks, yesterday that the behaviour of some of his fellow countrymen in Ireland was unacceptable.

There are up to 50,000 Latvians living in Ireland among the 165,000 workers from the EU’s new members at present.

A disproportionate number of them have been implicated in crime ranging from murders to extortion and gang warfare among Latvian workers.

The gardaí say about a fifth of road deaths in the last year on Irish roads were Eastern Europeans and a large number of these were from Latvia.

Mr Ahern said he explained to Mr Pabriks yesterday in Brussels, where they were both attending an EU meeting, that to Irish people and young people in particular drink driving is unacceptable and frowned on by the vast majority.

"But unfortunately the habits of the new immigrants are not in keeping with this and have resulted in some very serious car accidents," he said.

He also spoke to him about the number of murders involving some of his countrymen, including the latest in Dublin some weeks ago. "We also discussed the gang warfare," he said.

He added that he told him that while over half the 165,000 immigrants from the new member states are Polish, they cause very few problems. "His citizens account for a disproportionate amount of trouble," Mr

Ahern added.

Mr Pabriks suggested his government might send some police to Ireland to talk to the Latvian community, a move Mr Ahern said he would welcome.

Mr Ahern first raised the issue with Mr Pabriks when he was in Riga recently speaking on what the new EU member could learn from Ireland’s experience.

"I told him he should be more conscious of the very different type of issue we have to deal with in relation to some of his countrymen and women, especially their driving habits, and I suggested to him that he might come over to Ireland and get a brief from his people in Dublin."

 

Latvia police may help gardaí tackle immigrant crime

Garda

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
LATVIA may send police to Ireland to help sort out the high level of crime, including murders, gang warfare and drunk driving among Latvians living in the country.

Foreign Minister Dermot Ahern told his Latvian counterpart, Artis Pabriks, yesterday that the behaviour of some of his fellow countrymen in Ireland was unacceptable.

There are up to 50,000 Latvians living in Ireland among the 165,000 workers from the EU’s new members at present.

A disproportionate number of them have been implicated in crime ranging from murders to extortion and gang warfare among Latvian workers.

The gardaí say about a fifth of road deaths in the last year on Irish roads were Eastern Europeans and a large number of these were from Latvia.

Mr Ahern said he explained to Mr Pabriks yesterday in Brussels, where they were both attending an EU meeting, that to Irish people and young people in particular drink driving is unacceptable and frowned on by the vast majority.

"But unfortunately the habits of the new immigrants are not in keeping with this and have resulted in some very serious car accidents," he said.

He also spoke to him about the number of murders involving some of his countrymen, including the latest in Dublin some weeks ago. "We also discussed the gang warfare," he said.

He added that he told him that while over half the 165,000 immigrants from the new member states are Polish, they cause very few problems. "His citizens account for a disproportionate amount of trouble," Mr

Ahern added.

Mr Pabriks suggested his government might send some police to Ireland to talk to the Latvian community, a move Mr Ahern said he would welcome.

Mr Ahern first raised the issue with Mr Pabriks when he was in Riga recently speaking on what the new EU member could learn from Ireland’s experience.

"I told him he should be more conscious of the very different type of issue we have to deal with in relation to some of his countrymen and women, especially their driving habits, and I suggested to him that he might come over to Ireland and get a brief from his people in Dublin."