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Bailey witness claims garda harassment

Ian Bailey

By Eddie Cassidy
A KEY witness who sensationally withdrew statements in the Sophie Toscan du Plantier murder investigation has written to the Director of Public Prosecutions claiming her family were "unfairly treated" by gardaí.

In the letter, Marie Farrell named a garda she claims warned her that she and her family "would not have a day's peace no matter where they went in the country".

A district judge yesterday directed the letter should be released to the media.

The garda threat, she claimed, was made after she withdrew a statement relating to the murder inquiry.

Ms du Plantier was murdered in West Cork in December 1996. At a libel trial, Ms Farrell claimed she saw the self-confessed chief suspect, journalist Ian Bailey, on a bridge at Kealfadda near Schull hours before the body was found. She later withdrew this.

Details of the letter of complaint were revealed at Schull District Court yesterday where Ms Farrell's husband, Chris, faced a charge of assaulting local resident James McKenna.

Superintendent Liam Horgan described the letter as "a sinister attempt to muddy the waters" in the assault case.

In an application to adjourn the case against Mr Farrell of Ardmanagh, Schull, his solicitor Ray Hennessy introduced the letter into evidence.

Mr Hennessy said his client made complaints against James McKenna but the Farrells' allegations had not been acted upon by gardaí. The assault allegedly occurred at the Spar car park in Schull on March 29 last.

The solicitor did not read the letter to the court.

In the letter, Ms Farrell alleged her family was being harassed and that the gardaí had taken "no action despite several complaints being made by us".

Supt Horgan confirmed that all aspects of the case, including complaints against Mr McKenna, were sent in a file to the DPP. However, the DPP decided not to proceed with a prosecution against Mr McKenna.

The assault case was adjourned to allow Mr Farrell apply to the district court to have Mr McKenna bound to the peace.

 

Bailey witness claims garda harassment

Ian Bailey

By Eddie Cassidy
A KEY witness who sensationally withdrew statements in the Sophie Toscan du Plantier murder investigation has written to the Director of Public Prosecutions claiming her family were "unfairly treated" by gardaí.

In the letter, Marie Farrell named a garda she claims warned her that she and her family "would not have a day's peace no matter where they went in the country".

A district judge yesterday directed the letter should be released to the media.

The garda threat, she claimed, was made after she withdrew a statement relating to the murder inquiry.

Ms du Plantier was murdered in West Cork in December 1996. At a libel trial, Ms Farrell claimed she saw the self-confessed chief suspect, journalist Ian Bailey, on a bridge at Kealfadda near Schull hours before the body was found. She later withdrew this.

Details of the letter of complaint were revealed at Schull District Court yesterday where Ms Farrell's husband, Chris, faced a charge of assaulting local resident James McKenna.

Superintendent Liam Horgan described the letter as "a sinister attempt to muddy the waters" in the assault case.

In an application to adjourn the case against Mr Farrell of Ardmanagh, Schull, his solicitor Ray Hennessy introduced the letter into evidence.

Mr Hennessy said his client made complaints against James McKenna but the Farrells' allegations had not been acted upon by gardaí. The assault allegedly occurred at the Spar car park in Schull on March 29 last.

The solicitor did not read the letter to the court.

In the letter, Ms Farrell alleged her family was being harassed and that the gardaí had taken "no action despite several complaints being made by us".

Supt Horgan confirmed that all aspects of the case, including complaints against Mr McKenna, were sent in a file to the DPP. However, the DPP decided not to proceed with a prosecution against Mr McKenna.

The assault case was adjourned to allow Mr Farrell apply to the district court to have Mr McKenna bound to the peace.

 

Bailey witness claims garda harassment

Ian Bailey

By Eddie Cassidy
A KEY witness who sensationally withdrew statements in the Sophie Toscan du Plantier murder investigation has written to the Director of Public Prosecutions claiming her family were "unfairly treated" by gardaí.

In the letter, Marie Farrell named a garda she claims warned her that she and her family "would not have a day's peace no matter where they went in the country".

A district judge yesterday directed the letter should be released to the media.

The garda threat, she claimed, was made after she withdrew a statement relating to the murder inquiry.

Ms du Plantier was murdered in West Cork in December 1996. At a libel trial, Ms Farrell claimed she saw the self-confessed chief suspect, journalist Ian Bailey, on a bridge at Kealfadda near Schull hours before the body was found. She later withdrew this.

Details of the letter of complaint were revealed at Schull District Court yesterday where Ms Farrell's husband, Chris, faced a charge of assaulting local resident James McKenna.

Superintendent Liam Horgan described the letter as "a sinister attempt to muddy the waters" in the assault case.

In an application to adjourn the case against Mr Farrell of Ardmanagh, Schull, his solicitor Ray Hennessy introduced the letter into evidence.

Mr Hennessy said his client made complaints against James McKenna but the Farrells' allegations had not been acted upon by gardaí. The assault allegedly occurred at the Spar car park in Schull on March 29 last.

The solicitor did not read the letter to the court.

In the letter, Ms Farrell alleged her family was being harassed and that the gardaí had taken "no action despite several complaints being made by us".

Supt Horgan confirmed that all aspects of the case, including complaints against Mr McKenna, were sent in a file to the DPP. However, the DPP decided not to proceed with a prosecution against Mr McKenna.

The assault case was adjourned to allow Mr Farrell apply to the district court to have Mr McKenna bound to the peace.

 

Bailey witness claims garda harassment

Ian Bailey

By Eddie Cassidy
A KEY witness who sensationally withdrew statements in the Sophie Toscan du Plantier murder investigation has written to the Director of Public Prosecutions claiming her family were "unfairly treated" by gardaí.

In the letter, Marie Farrell named a garda she claims warned her that she and her family "would not have a day's peace no matter where they went in the country".

A district judge yesterday directed the letter should be released to the media.

The garda threat, she claimed, was made after she withdrew a statement relating to the murder inquiry.

Ms du Plantier was murdered in West Cork in December 1996. At a libel trial, Ms Farrell claimed she saw the self-confessed chief suspect, journalist Ian Bailey, on a bridge at Kealfadda near Schull hours before the body was found. She later withdrew this.

Details of the letter of complaint were revealed at Schull District Court yesterday where Ms Farrell's husband, Chris, faced a charge of assaulting local resident James McKenna.

Superintendent Liam Horgan described the letter as "a sinister attempt to muddy the waters" in the assault case.

In an application to adjourn the case against Mr Farrell of Ardmanagh, Schull, his solicitor Ray Hennessy introduced the letter into evidence.

Mr Hennessy said his client made complaints against James McKenna but the Farrells' allegations had not been acted upon by gardaí. The assault allegedly occurred at the Spar car park in Schull on March 29 last.

The solicitor did not read the letter to the court.

In the letter, Ms Farrell alleged her family was being harassed and that the gardaí had taken "no action despite several complaints being made by us".

Supt Horgan confirmed that all aspects of the case, including complaints against Mr McKenna, were sent in a file to the DPP. However, the DPP decided not to proceed with a prosecution against Mr McKenna.

The assault case was adjourned to allow Mr Farrell apply to the district court to have Mr McKenna bound to the peace.