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Gardaí probed three CIA kidnap claims

secret service

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
THE gardaí investigated three allegations relating to CIA flights transporting kidnapped terror suspects through Shannon Airport, the Government confirmed yesterday.

Files on two of the complaints were considered serious enough to be sent to the DPP but no action was taken because of a lack of evidence.

The information was part of a 24-page report sent by the Department of Foreign Affairs to the Council of Europe committee investigating allegations of secret prisons and covert CIA flights in Europe.

It stresses that the gardaí have powers to search any civilian aircraft. However, so far they have not exercised this power.

A spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern said the department did not see any reason why the gardaí should search aircraft. "We would not see any reason to because we have received categorical assurances from the US that they are not using Shannon in this way," he said.

The report categorically denies that any official of the State has been involved in any way with "unacknowledged deprivation of liberty", with transporting any one detained in this way.

Prisoners may be held by foreign authorities on Irish territory only if they are passing through while being extradited or when a sentenced prisoner is being transferred.

The 2001 Ireland-US Extradition agreement allows US officials to detain prisoners in Ireland when they are passing through the country provided they receive permission each time.

The report repeats statements by Mr Ahern recording the Government’s "very deep concern" over allegations of the possible existence of secret prisons, and its "complete opposition to the practice of so-called extraordinary rendition".

Yesterday was the deadline for submission of the questionnaire to the Council of Europe.

The Swiss lawyer heading up the investigation, Dick Marty, has already said he believes governments could not have been unaware of CIA rendition flights on their territory.

He is due to produce a report in March.

 

Gardaí probed three CIA kidnap claims

secret service

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
THE gardaí investigated three allegations relating to CIA flights transporting kidnapped terror suspects through Shannon Airport, the Government confirmed yesterday.

Files on two of the complaints were considered serious enough to be sent to the DPP but no action was taken because of a lack of evidence.

The information was part of a 24-page report sent by the Department of Foreign Affairs to the Council of Europe committee investigating allegations of secret prisons and covert CIA flights in Europe.

It stresses that the gardaí have powers to search any civilian aircraft. However, so far they have not exercised this power.

A spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern said the department did not see any reason why the gardaí should search aircraft. "We would not see any reason to because we have received categorical assurances from the US that they are not using Shannon in this way," he said.

The report categorically denies that any official of the State has been involved in any way with "unacknowledged deprivation of liberty", with transporting any one detained in this way.

Prisoners may be held by foreign authorities on Irish territory only if they are passing through while being extradited or when a sentenced prisoner is being transferred.

The 2001 Ireland-US Extradition agreement allows US officials to detain prisoners in Ireland when they are passing through the country provided they receive permission each time.

The report repeats statements by Mr Ahern recording the Government’s "very deep concern" over allegations of the possible existence of secret prisons, and its "complete opposition to the practice of so-called extraordinary rendition".

Yesterday was the deadline for submission of the questionnaire to the Council of Europe.

The Swiss lawyer heading up the investigation, Dick Marty, has already said he believes governments could not have been unaware of CIA rendition flights on their territory.

He is due to produce a report in March.

 

Gardaí probed three CIA kidnap claims

secret service

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
THE gardaí investigated three allegations relating to CIA flights transporting kidnapped terror suspects through Shannon Airport, the Government confirmed yesterday.

Files on two of the complaints were considered serious enough to be sent to the DPP but no action was taken because of a lack of evidence.

The information was part of a 24-page report sent by the Department of Foreign Affairs to the Council of Europe committee investigating allegations of secret prisons and covert CIA flights in Europe.

It stresses that the gardaí have powers to search any civilian aircraft. However, so far they have not exercised this power.

A spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern said the department did not see any reason why the gardaí should search aircraft. "We would not see any reason to because we have received categorical assurances from the US that they are not using Shannon in this way," he said.

The report categorically denies that any official of the State has been involved in any way with "unacknowledged deprivation of liberty", with transporting any one detained in this way.

Prisoners may be held by foreign authorities on Irish territory only if they are passing through while being extradited or when a sentenced prisoner is being transferred.

The 2001 Ireland-US Extradition agreement allows US officials to detain prisoners in Ireland when they are passing through the country provided they receive permission each time.

The report repeats statements by Mr Ahern recording the Government’s "very deep concern" over allegations of the possible existence of secret prisons, and its "complete opposition to the practice of so-called extraordinary rendition".

Yesterday was the deadline for submission of the questionnaire to the Council of Europe.

The Swiss lawyer heading up the investigation, Dick Marty, has already said he believes governments could not have been unaware of CIA rendition flights on their territory.

He is due to produce a report in March.

 

Gardaí probed three CIA kidnap claims

secret service

By Ann Cahill, Europe Correspondent
THE gardaí investigated three allegations relating to CIA flights transporting kidnapped terror suspects through Shannon Airport, the Government confirmed yesterday.

Files on two of the complaints were considered serious enough to be sent to the DPP but no action was taken because of a lack of evidence.

The information was part of a 24-page report sent by the Department of Foreign Affairs to the Council of Europe committee investigating allegations of secret prisons and covert CIA flights in Europe.

It stresses that the gardaí have powers to search any civilian aircraft. However, so far they have not exercised this power.

A spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern said the department did not see any reason why the gardaí should search aircraft. "We would not see any reason to because we have received categorical assurances from the US that they are not using Shannon in this way," he said.

The report categorically denies that any official of the State has been involved in any way with "unacknowledged deprivation of liberty", with transporting any one detained in this way.

Prisoners may be held by foreign authorities on Irish territory only if they are passing through while being extradited or when a sentenced prisoner is being transferred.

The 2001 Ireland-US Extradition agreement allows US officials to detain prisoners in Ireland when they are passing through the country provided they receive permission each time.

The report repeats statements by Mr Ahern recording the Government’s "very deep concern" over allegations of the possible existence of secret prisons, and its "complete opposition to the practice of so-called extraordinary rendition".

Yesterday was the deadline for submission of the questionnaire to the Council of Europe.

The Swiss lawyer heading up the investigation, Dick Marty, has already said he believes governments could not have been unaware of CIA rendition flights on their territory.

He is due to produce a report in March.