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BCI plans to award radio licence

BCI

By Ian Guider
THE Broadcasting Commission of Ireland (BCI) plans to award a licence to run a commercial radio station in the south-west.

The licence, which is aimed at 15-34-year-olds, will allow the station to broadcast across Kerry, Limerick, Clare, north Tipperary and south-west Laois.

Whoever wins the 10-year licence, which will be awarded following a review of all applicants in a so-called beauty parade, will have to offer a mix of speech and music programming.

The BCI will take applications for the licence until April 16 and its board will then decide on the winner. The BCI may hold oral hearings before picking the winning bid.

Applicants for the station will have to provide news coverage as well as music and talk shows. The BCI requires all commercial stations to provide two hours of news coverage a day.

Given the potential value of the station to the winner of the licence, it is expected to be a hotly-contested battle. It is expected that media groups from Ireland and Britain will submit applications to the BCI.

The number of independently-owned radio stations in the Irish market has decreased in recent years with the likes of Ulster Television, Scottish Radio Holdings and EMAP entering the market. A number of Irish media groups, including Denis O’Brien’s Communicorp (which owns a similar station in the Dublin region) are also expected to take an interest in the licence.

Such is the potential value of the licences when resold that figures from outside the media industry have also taken a look at getting into the radio market.

The BCI is currently waiting on a decision from the Supreme Court to award the licence for a rock radio station in Dublin.

A ruling on the decision to award the licence to Phantom FM, a station backed by concert promoters Denis Desmond and Paul McGuinness, is expected in the next few weeks.

The challenge to the BCI’s decision was mounted by Bob Geldof, who is backing a rival consortium.

The BCI will next week publish details of the application for the national commercial radio licence.

 

BCI plans to award radio licence

BCI

By Ian Guider
THE Broadcasting Commission of Ireland (BCI) plans to award a licence to run a commercial radio station in the south-west.

The licence, which is aimed at 15-34-year-olds, will allow the station to broadcast across Kerry, Limerick, Clare, north Tipperary and south-west Laois.

Whoever wins the 10-year licence, which will be awarded following a review of all applicants in a so-called beauty parade, will have to offer a mix of speech and music programming.

The BCI will take applications for the licence until April 16 and its board will then decide on the winner. The BCI may hold oral hearings before picking the winning bid.

Applicants for the station will have to provide news coverage as well as music and talk shows. The BCI requires all commercial stations to provide two hours of news coverage a day.

Given the potential value of the station to the winner of the licence, it is expected to be a hotly-contested battle. It is expected that media groups from Ireland and Britain will submit applications to the BCI.

The number of independently-owned radio stations in the Irish market has decreased in recent years with the likes of Ulster Television, Scottish Radio Holdings and EMAP entering the market. A number of Irish media groups, including Denis O’Brien’s Communicorp (which owns a similar station in the Dublin region) are also expected to take an interest in the licence.

Such is the potential value of the licences when resold that figures from outside the media industry have also taken a look at getting into the radio market.

The BCI is currently waiting on a decision from the Supreme Court to award the licence for a rock radio station in Dublin.

A ruling on the decision to award the licence to Phantom FM, a station backed by concert promoters Denis Desmond and Paul McGuinness, is expected in the next few weeks.

The challenge to the BCI’s decision was mounted by Bob Geldof, who is backing a rival consortium.

The BCI will next week publish details of the application for the national commercial radio licence.

 

BCI plans to award radio licence

BCI

By Ian Guider
THE Broadcasting Commission of Ireland (BCI) plans to award a licence to run a commercial radio station in the south-west.

The licence, which is aimed at 15-34-year-olds, will allow the station to broadcast across Kerry, Limerick, Clare, north Tipperary and south-west Laois.

Whoever wins the 10-year licence, which will be awarded following a review of all applicants in a so-called beauty parade, will have to offer a mix of speech and music programming.

The BCI will take applications for the licence until April 16 and its board will then decide on the winner. The BCI may hold oral hearings before picking the winning bid.

Applicants for the station will have to provide news coverage as well as music and talk shows. The BCI requires all commercial stations to provide two hours of news coverage a day.

Given the potential value of the station to the winner of the licence, it is expected to be a hotly-contested battle. It is expected that media groups from Ireland and Britain will submit applications to the BCI.

The number of independently-owned radio stations in the Irish market has decreased in recent years with the likes of Ulster Television, Scottish Radio Holdings and EMAP entering the market. A number of Irish media groups, including Denis O’Brien’s Communicorp (which owns a similar station in the Dublin region) are also expected to take an interest in the licence.

Such is the potential value of the licences when resold that figures from outside the media industry have also taken a look at getting into the radio market.

The BCI is currently waiting on a decision from the Supreme Court to award the licence for a rock radio station in Dublin.

A ruling on the decision to award the licence to Phantom FM, a station backed by concert promoters Denis Desmond and Paul McGuinness, is expected in the next few weeks.

The challenge to the BCI’s decision was mounted by Bob Geldof, who is backing a rival consortium.

The BCI will next week publish details of the application for the national commercial radio licence.

 

BCI plans to award radio licence

BCI

By Ian Guider
THE Broadcasting Commission of Ireland (BCI) plans to award a licence to run a commercial radio station in the south-west.

The licence, which is aimed at 15-34-year-olds, will allow the station to broadcast across Kerry, Limerick, Clare, north Tipperary and south-west Laois.

Whoever wins the 10-year licence, which will be awarded following a review of all applicants in a so-called beauty parade, will have to offer a mix of speech and music programming.

The BCI will take applications for the licence until April 16 and its board will then decide on the winner. The BCI may hold oral hearings before picking the winning bid.

Applicants for the station will have to provide news coverage as well as music and talk shows. The BCI requires all commercial stations to provide two hours of news coverage a day.

Given the potential value of the station to the winner of the licence, it is expected to be a hotly-contested battle. It is expected that media groups from Ireland and Britain will submit applications to the BCI.

The number of independently-owned radio stations in the Irish market has decreased in recent years with the likes of Ulster Television, Scottish Radio Holdings and EMAP entering the market. A number of Irish media groups, including Denis O’Brien’s Communicorp (which owns a similar station in the Dublin region) are also expected to take an interest in the licence.

Such is the potential value of the licences when resold that figures from outside the media industry have also taken a look at getting into the radio market.

The BCI is currently waiting on a decision from the Supreme Court to award the licence for a rock radio station in Dublin.

A ruling on the decision to award the licence to Phantom FM, a station backed by concert promoters Denis Desmond and Paul McGuinness, is expected in the next few weeks.

The challenge to the BCI’s decision was mounted by Bob Geldof, who is backing a rival consortium.

The BCI will next week publish details of the application for the national commercial radio licence.