You are viewing the content for Monday 20 February 2006

GPs threaten to withdraw out-of-hours coverage

doctor stethoscope

By Seán McCárthaigh
DOCTORS have warned that they may be forced to withdraw out-of-hours coverage for patients unless the Department of Health and Health Services Executive offer more support to GPs.

Public patients could face waiting lists to visit their GP unless the Government provides greater funding for family doctor services, the Irish Medical Organisation has warned.

Dr Martin Daly, chairman of the IMO’s GP committee, says it is no longer realistic to expect newly qualified doctors to operate 24-hour services. He warned that patients in deprived urban and rural parts of the country would suffer most from the failure of the Government to offer greater incentives for doctors to develop their practices.

Doctors could also be forced to discriminate between private and public patients, he warned.

Delegates at an IMO national conference in Dublin at the weekend were told that it was becoming less attractive for young doctors to set up in disadvantaged areas, due to the lack of financial supports from the State.

Dr Daly criticised the Government for, so far, only delivering €20 million of the estimated €1.3 billion cost of implementing its primary healthcare strategy.

"We have the HSE and the minister lauding the central role for general practice in the reform of the health services, but it is accompanied by a paucity of executive action," he said.

Doctors were willing to invest in their practices but were becoming frustrated at the lack of State support, he told the conference.

Dr Daly expressed anger that the Government could introduce tax incentives for the development of sports clinics, hotels, car parks and seaside resorts, but not primary healthcare.

He pointed out that, although only 30% of general practice is currently sponsored by the Government, it still enjoyed a reputation for high patient satisfaction and good quality care.

The IMO official said it was "really regrettable" that both the Department of Health and the HSE seemed unable to separate the issue from the question of doctors’ pay.

More than 150 delegates heard Dr Daly also express concern about the Government "obsession" to control general practice.

He also expressed frustration at the Government’s "perplexing" policy of dismantling the means test for medical card eligibility as well as its "begrudging attitude" to support the development of GP practices.

 

GPs threaten to withdraw out-of-hours coverage

doctor stethoscope

By Seán McCárthaigh
DOCTORS have warned that they may be forced to withdraw out-of-hours coverage for patients unless the Department of Health and Health Services Executive offer more support to GPs.

Public patients could face waiting lists to visit their GP unless the Government provides greater funding for family doctor services, the Irish Medical Organisation has warned.

Dr Martin Daly, chairman of the IMO’s GP committee, says it is no longer realistic to expect newly qualified doctors to operate 24-hour services. He warned that patients in deprived urban and rural parts of the country would suffer most from the failure of the Government to offer greater incentives for doctors to develop their practices.

Doctors could also be forced to discriminate between private and public patients, he warned.

Delegates at an IMO national conference in Dublin at the weekend were told that it was becoming less attractive for young doctors to set up in disadvantaged areas, due to the lack of financial supports from the State.

Dr Daly criticised the Government for, so far, only delivering €20 million of the estimated €1.3 billion cost of implementing its primary healthcare strategy.

"We have the HSE and the minister lauding the central role for general practice in the reform of the health services, but it is accompanied by a paucity of executive action," he said.

Doctors were willing to invest in their practices but were becoming frustrated at the lack of State support, he told the conference.

Dr Daly expressed anger that the Government could introduce tax incentives for the development of sports clinics, hotels, car parks and seaside resorts, but not primary healthcare.

He pointed out that, although only 30% of general practice is currently sponsored by the Government, it still enjoyed a reputation for high patient satisfaction and good quality care.

The IMO official said it was "really regrettable" that both the Department of Health and the HSE seemed unable to separate the issue from the question of doctors’ pay.

More than 150 delegates heard Dr Daly also express concern about the Government "obsession" to control general practice.

He also expressed frustration at the Government’s "perplexing" policy of dismantling the means test for medical card eligibility as well as its "begrudging attitude" to support the development of GP practices.

 

GPs threaten to withdraw out-of-hours coverage

doctor stethoscope

By Seán McCárthaigh
DOCTORS have warned that they may be forced to withdraw out-of-hours coverage for patients unless the Department of Health and Health Services Executive offer more support to GPs.

Public patients could face waiting lists to visit their GP unless the Government provides greater funding for family doctor services, the Irish Medical Organisation has warned.

Dr Martin Daly, chairman of the IMO’s GP committee, says it is no longer realistic to expect newly qualified doctors to operate 24-hour services. He warned that patients in deprived urban and rural parts of the country would suffer most from the failure of the Government to offer greater incentives for doctors to develop their practices.

Doctors could also be forced to discriminate between private and public patients, he warned.

Delegates at an IMO national conference in Dublin at the weekend were told that it was becoming less attractive for young doctors to set up in disadvantaged areas, due to the lack of financial supports from the State.

Dr Daly criticised the Government for, so far, only delivering €20 million of the estimated €1.3 billion cost of implementing its primary healthcare strategy.

"We have the HSE and the minister lauding the central role for general practice in the reform of the health services, but it is accompanied by a paucity of executive action," he said.

Doctors were willing to invest in their practices but were becoming frustrated at the lack of State support, he told the conference.

Dr Daly expressed anger that the Government could introduce tax incentives for the development of sports clinics, hotels, car parks and seaside resorts, but not primary healthcare.

He pointed out that, although only 30% of general practice is currently sponsored by the Government, it still enjoyed a reputation for high patient satisfaction and good quality care.

The IMO official said it was "really regrettable" that both the Department of Health and the HSE seemed unable to separate the issue from the question of doctors’ pay.

More than 150 delegates heard Dr Daly also express concern about the Government "obsession" to control general practice.

He also expressed frustration at the Government’s "perplexing" policy of dismantling the means test for medical card eligibility as well as its "begrudging attitude" to support the development of GP practices.

 

GPs threaten to withdraw out-of-hours coverage

doctor stethoscope

By Seán McCárthaigh
DOCTORS have warned that they may be forced to withdraw out-of-hours coverage for patients unless the Department of Health and Health Services Executive offer more support to GPs.

Public patients could face waiting lists to visit their GP unless the Government provides greater funding for family doctor services, the Irish Medical Organisation has warned.

Dr Martin Daly, chairman of the IMO’s GP committee, says it is no longer realistic to expect newly qualified doctors to operate 24-hour services. He warned that patients in deprived urban and rural parts of the country would suffer most from the failure of the Government to offer greater incentives for doctors to develop their practices.

Doctors could also be forced to discriminate between private and public patients, he warned.

Delegates at an IMO national conference in Dublin at the weekend were told that it was becoming less attractive for young doctors to set up in disadvantaged areas, due to the lack of financial supports from the State.

Dr Daly criticised the Government for, so far, only delivering €20 million of the estimated €1.3 billion cost of implementing its primary healthcare strategy.

"We have the HSE and the minister lauding the central role for general practice in the reform of the health services, but it is accompanied by a paucity of executive action," he said.

Doctors were willing to invest in their practices but were becoming frustrated at the lack of State support, he told the conference.

Dr Daly expressed anger that the Government could introduce tax incentives for the development of sports clinics, hotels, car parks and seaside resorts, but not primary healthcare.

He pointed out that, although only 30% of general practice is currently sponsored by the Government, it still enjoyed a reputation for high patient satisfaction and good quality care.

The IMO official said it was "really regrettable" that both the Department of Health and the HSE seemed unable to separate the issue from the question of doctors’ pay.

More than 150 delegates heard Dr Daly also express concern about the Government "obsession" to control general practice.

He also expressed frustration at the Government’s "perplexing" policy of dismantling the means test for medical card eligibility as well as its "begrudging attitude" to support the development of GP practices.