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Meat ban on imports will force beef prices upwards

Brazil

By Stephen Cadogan
EU beef prices are likely to rise as a foot and mouth ban already on meat from three Brazilian states is extended to Argentina.

The widening ban on South American beef will leave the EU’s deficit of 400,000 tonnes between domestic production and consumer demand setting a trend of rising prices.

Imports of beef slaughtered after February 4, from the disease hit Argentinian province of Corrientes and six neighbouring regions, are likely to be banned. Russia, which takes 20% of Argentina’s beef exports, is likely to follow suit.

Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Israel, Paraguay, Peru, Singapore, South Africa and Uruguay immediately banned all imports of beef and beef byproducts last week from Argentina, the world’s third-largest exporter of beef.

The EU takes the largest share of Argentina’s 1,400 million per year beef exports.

With about 9,000 tonnes (and about 6,000 tonnes of corned beef) annually going to the UK, which is Ireland’s main customer for beef, farmers here are likely to gain from the effect on the market trends. But they will also recall their own narrow escape from devastation by the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in the UK, and be fully aware of the potential for foot and mouth to wreck the beef industry - particularly now because the disease has also struck recently within miles of the EU border, in the Thrace region of Turkey, which shares a border with Greece.

All 3,500 head on the affected 15,000 acre ranch in Argentina were slaughtered, after about 70 cattle were found to have foot and mouth symptoms.

The disease may have come from illegal imports of live cattle from Paraguay, where prices are lower.

It will have a disproportionate effect on a world beef supply already hit by prolonged drought in Australia, the aftermath of BSE discoveries in the US and Canada, tates, and FMD in Brazil.

But Brazil still managed to increase its beef exports in 2005 by 30% despite the disease outbreak in October, and Argentina may also increase production from non-affected areas, in order to exploit the world beef supply shortage.

 

Meat ban on imports will force beef prices upwards

Brazil

By Stephen Cadogan
EU beef prices are likely to rise as a foot and mouth ban already on meat from three Brazilian states is extended to Argentina.

The widening ban on South American beef will leave the EU’s deficit of 400,000 tonnes between domestic production and consumer demand setting a trend of rising prices.

Imports of beef slaughtered after February 4, from the disease hit Argentinian province of Corrientes and six neighbouring regions, are likely to be banned. Russia, which takes 20% of Argentina’s beef exports, is likely to follow suit.

Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Israel, Paraguay, Peru, Singapore, South Africa and Uruguay immediately banned all imports of beef and beef byproducts last week from Argentina, the world’s third-largest exporter of beef.

The EU takes the largest share of Argentina’s 1,400 million per year beef exports.

With about 9,000 tonnes (and about 6,000 tonnes of corned beef) annually going to the UK, which is Ireland’s main customer for beef, farmers here are likely to gain from the effect on the market trends. But they will also recall their own narrow escape from devastation by the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in the UK, and be fully aware of the potential for foot and mouth to wreck the beef industry - particularly now because the disease has also struck recently within miles of the EU border, in the Thrace region of Turkey, which shares a border with Greece.

All 3,500 head on the affected 15,000 acre ranch in Argentina were slaughtered, after about 70 cattle were found to have foot and mouth symptoms.

The disease may have come from illegal imports of live cattle from Paraguay, where prices are lower.

It will have a disproportionate effect on a world beef supply already hit by prolonged drought in Australia, the aftermath of BSE discoveries in the US and Canada, tates, and FMD in Brazil.

But Brazil still managed to increase its beef exports in 2005 by 30% despite the disease outbreak in October, and Argentina may also increase production from non-affected areas, in order to exploit the world beef supply shortage.

 

Meat ban on imports will force beef prices upwards

Brazil

By Stephen Cadogan
EU beef prices are likely to rise as a foot and mouth ban already on meat from three Brazilian states is extended to Argentina.

The widening ban on South American beef will leave the EU’s deficit of 400,000 tonnes between domestic production and consumer demand setting a trend of rising prices.

Imports of beef slaughtered after February 4, from the disease hit Argentinian province of Corrientes and six neighbouring regions, are likely to be banned. Russia, which takes 20% of Argentina’s beef exports, is likely to follow suit.

Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Israel, Paraguay, Peru, Singapore, South Africa and Uruguay immediately banned all imports of beef and beef byproducts last week from Argentina, the world’s third-largest exporter of beef.

The EU takes the largest share of Argentina’s 1,400 million per year beef exports.

With about 9,000 tonnes (and about 6,000 tonnes of corned beef) annually going to the UK, which is Ireland’s main customer for beef, farmers here are likely to gain from the effect on the market trends. But they will also recall their own narrow escape from devastation by the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in the UK, and be fully aware of the potential for foot and mouth to wreck the beef industry - particularly now because the disease has also struck recently within miles of the EU border, in the Thrace region of Turkey, which shares a border with Greece.

All 3,500 head on the affected 15,000 acre ranch in Argentina were slaughtered, after about 70 cattle were found to have foot and mouth symptoms.

The disease may have come from illegal imports of live cattle from Paraguay, where prices are lower.

It will have a disproportionate effect on a world beef supply already hit by prolonged drought in Australia, the aftermath of BSE discoveries in the US and Canada, tates, and FMD in Brazil.

But Brazil still managed to increase its beef exports in 2005 by 30% despite the disease outbreak in October, and Argentina may also increase production from non-affected areas, in order to exploit the world beef supply shortage.