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Regions ‘not getting investment’

IDA chief Sean Dorgan

By Brian O’Mahony, Chief Business Correspondent
IDA Ireland faced strong criticism yesterday for its failure to get sufficient investment to the regions.

Members of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Enterprise & Small Business demanded explanations from IDA boss Sean Dorgan why areas such as east Galway, Kerry and Clare had done so badly in recent years.

Mr Dorgan and other executives were before the committee to discuss the IDA’s 2004 annual report.

Senator Fergal Browne said IDA facilities were not attracting any investment and questioned the body’s commitment to regional development.

Mr Dorgan said there were 28 business and technology parks of a worldclass standard nationwide.

But Carlow-based Senator Browne told committee members that there had been no major industry in his town since 1973.

"We’re blue in the face from listening to the IDA telling us how great our area is. There are lots of business parks around the country but we’re not getting any investment into them.

"The reality is that they are lying idle and they’re costing millions. I see no proof of any proper regional development."

Mr Dorgan said: "I don’t regard it as a matter of failure or fault that we have parks that are ready for new investment. I think that’s what we need.

"I think that if every park was full or almost full, we would be failing in our provisions."

He added the business parks should not be "seen as a source of criticism, but a commitment for the future."

Senator Mary White was ruled out of order when she asked if the use of Shannon by the US military was damaging our reputation internationally.

Kathleen Lynch, Labour TD for Cork City, asked if enough was being done on upskilling.

Mr Dorgan said upskilling was given very serious attention by IDA and Fás to ensure Ireland retained its ability to compete internationally.

He also noted the dramatic change in the nature of inward investment.

Investors require "large population bases with a strong urban centre" to create a clustering effect. Industries go where they know they will get staff and the back-up required to run their businesses.

On that basis IDA has to look at the bigger picture when setting about attracting companies to a region, he said.

It was no longer good strategy to think of a single town as a location for inward investment, said Mr Dorgan.

"Competition exists between every location in Ireland and every location internationally."

 

Regions ‘not getting investment’

IDA chief Sean Dorgan

By Brian O’Mahony, Chief Business Correspondent
IDA Ireland faced strong criticism yesterday for its failure to get sufficient investment to the regions.

Members of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Enterprise & Small Business demanded explanations from IDA boss Sean Dorgan why areas such as east Galway, Kerry and Clare had done so badly in recent years.

Mr Dorgan and other executives were before the committee to discuss the IDA’s 2004 annual report.

Senator Fergal Browne said IDA facilities were not attracting any investment and questioned the body’s commitment to regional development.

Mr Dorgan said there were 28 business and technology parks of a worldclass standard nationwide.

But Carlow-based Senator Browne told committee members that there had been no major industry in his town since 1973.

"We’re blue in the face from listening to the IDA telling us how great our area is. There are lots of business parks around the country but we’re not getting any investment into them.

"The reality is that they are lying idle and they’re costing millions. I see no proof of any proper regional development."

Mr Dorgan said: "I don’t regard it as a matter of failure or fault that we have parks that are ready for new investment. I think that’s what we need.

"I think that if every park was full or almost full, we would be failing in our provisions."

He added the business parks should not be "seen as a source of criticism, but a commitment for the future."

Senator Mary White was ruled out of order when she asked if the use of Shannon by the US military was damaging our reputation internationally.

Kathleen Lynch, Labour TD for Cork City, asked if enough was being done on upskilling.

Mr Dorgan said upskilling was given very serious attention by IDA and Fás to ensure Ireland retained its ability to compete internationally.

He also noted the dramatic change in the nature of inward investment.

Investors require "large population bases with a strong urban centre" to create a clustering effect. Industries go where they know they will get staff and the back-up required to run their businesses.

On that basis IDA has to look at the bigger picture when setting about attracting companies to a region, he said.

It was no longer good strategy to think of a single town as a location for inward investment, said Mr Dorgan.

"Competition exists between every location in Ireland and every location internationally."

 

Regions ‘not getting investment’

IDA chief Sean Dorgan

By Brian O’Mahony, Chief Business Correspondent
IDA Ireland faced strong criticism yesterday for its failure to get sufficient investment to the regions.

Members of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Enterprise & Small Business demanded explanations from IDA boss Sean Dorgan why areas such as east Galway, Kerry and Clare had done so badly in recent years.

Mr Dorgan and other executives were before the committee to discuss the IDA’s 2004 annual report.

Senator Fergal Browne said IDA facilities were not attracting any investment and questioned the body’s commitment to regional development.

Mr Dorgan said there were 28 business and technology parks of a worldclass standard nationwide.

But Carlow-based Senator Browne told committee members that there had been no major industry in his town since 1973.

"We’re blue in the face from listening to the IDA telling us how great our area is. There are lots of business parks around the country but we’re not getting any investment into them.

"The reality is that they are lying idle and they’re costing millions. I see no proof of any proper regional development."

Mr Dorgan said: "I don’t regard it as a matter of failure or fault that we have parks that are ready for new investment. I think that’s what we need.

"I think that if every park was full or almost full, we would be failing in our provisions."

He added the business parks should not be "seen as a source of criticism, but a commitment for the future."

Senator Mary White was ruled out of order when she asked if the use of Shannon by the US military was damaging our reputation internationally.

Kathleen Lynch, Labour TD for Cork City, asked if enough was being done on upskilling.

Mr Dorgan said upskilling was given very serious attention by IDA and Fás to ensure Ireland retained its ability to compete internationally.

He also noted the dramatic change in the nature of inward investment.

Investors require "large population bases with a strong urban centre" to create a clustering effect. Industries go where they know they will get staff and the back-up required to run their businesses.

On that basis IDA has to look at the bigger picture when setting about attracting companies to a region, he said.

It was no longer good strategy to think of a single town as a location for inward investment, said Mr Dorgan.

"Competition exists between every location in Ireland and every location internationally."

 

Regions ‘not getting investment’

IDA chief Sean Dorgan

By Brian O’Mahony, Chief Business Correspondent
IDA Ireland faced strong criticism yesterday for its failure to get sufficient investment to the regions.

Members of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Enterprise & Small Business demanded explanations from IDA boss Sean Dorgan why areas such as east Galway, Kerry and Clare had done so badly in recent years.

Mr Dorgan and other executives were before the committee to discuss the IDA’s 2004 annual report.

Senator Fergal Browne said IDA facilities were not attracting any investment and questioned the body’s commitment to regional development.

Mr Dorgan said there were 28 business and technology parks of a worldclass standard nationwide.

But Carlow-based Senator Browne told committee members that there had been no major industry in his town since 1973.

"We’re blue in the face from listening to the IDA telling us how great our area is. There are lots of business parks around the country but we’re not getting any investment into them.

"The reality is that they are lying idle and they’re costing millions. I see no proof of any proper regional development."

Mr Dorgan said: "I don’t regard it as a matter of failure or fault that we have parks that are ready for new investment. I think that’s what we need.

"I think that if every park was full or almost full, we would be failing in our provisions."

He added the business parks should not be "seen as a source of criticism, but a commitment for the future."

Senator Mary White was ruled out of order when she asked if the use of Shannon by the US military was damaging our reputation internationally.

Kathleen Lynch, Labour TD for Cork City, asked if enough was being done on upskilling.

Mr Dorgan said upskilling was given very serious attention by IDA and Fás to ensure Ireland retained its ability to compete internationally.

He also noted the dramatic change in the nature of inward investment.

Investors require "large population bases with a strong urban centre" to create a clustering effect. Industries go where they know they will get staff and the back-up required to run their businesses.

On that basis IDA has to look at the bigger picture when setting about attracting companies to a region, he said.

It was no longer good strategy to think of a single town as a location for inward investment, said Mr Dorgan.

"Competition exists between every location in Ireland and every location internationally."