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Frustrated Laporte vents fury on ‘bourgeois’ French fans

By Brendan O’Brien
FRENCH coach Bernard Laporte launched an astonishing Roy Keane-style attack on his own country’s fans after out-half Frederic Michalak was booed off the field on Saturday.

The Stade de France crowd had already barracked the Toulouse player on a handful of occasions when clearances to touch skewed off his boot, but the chorus of boos and whistles as he left the field after 69 minutes was surprisingly ferocious.

"The only people that should be allowed into the stadiums are the volunteers and the amateurs. We will put (the supporters) on the pitch and see how much they know about rugby," said Laporte, who went on to describe the fans as "bourgeois shits."

"It's time to educate the French public," added manager Jo Maso. "Let them remember that it was when we were 43-3 ahead that the Irish supporters started to sing. We would very much like to have the same support from the French public."

Michalak, a brilliant but frustrating talent, has been dropped by Laporte in the past and the French coach warned before the game that his number 10 and the rest of the panel needed to step up to the plate if they were to avoid the fate of those players culled after the Scottish defeat.

"It's true that he alternated the good and the not-so-good," admitted the 42-year-old. "Personally I'm satisfied with his performance. Above all, I want to back him and support him, unlike some elements of the public."

The French may have secured their first victory of this Six Nations Championship but few will have been convinced by the performance or their fitness levels.

Laporte admitted Ireland were far the fitter team as the last quarter grew legs, but he was at a loss to explain why pointing the finger indirectly at the workload of the domestic league.

"I'm not really qualified to say why they were physically fitter than us. What we do when we have the team together isn't mainly physical work.

"The Irish are probably the most club-like team in Europe and maybe the world, in that they're always working together, doing little courses together. Beyond that I'm not sure what the answer is."

Laporte admitted watching the last 30 minutes of the game was like a nightmare or watching a film, but was adamant that there was more positives than negatives from the day's work.

Jo Maso was more forthcoming with his concerns. "When you're up against world-class centres like D'Arcy and O'Driscoll, it's difficult when you keep handing the ball back to them. The other point is that, when 40 points down, they were basically fearless.

"They had nothing to lose so that probably pushed them to come back.

"We did crack in the last few minutes and if it had gone on another 10 minutes we would have been in trouble."

 

Frustrated Laporte vents fury on ‘bourgeois’ French fans

By Brendan O’Brien
FRENCH coach Bernard Laporte launched an astonishing Roy Keane-style attack on his own country’s fans after out-half Frederic Michalak was booed off the field on Saturday.

The Stade de France crowd had already barracked the Toulouse player on a handful of occasions when clearances to touch skewed off his boot, but the chorus of boos and whistles as he left the field after 69 minutes was surprisingly ferocious.

"The only people that should be allowed into the stadiums are the volunteers and the amateurs. We will put (the supporters) on the pitch and see how much they know about rugby," said Laporte, who went on to describe the fans as "bourgeois shits."

"It's time to educate the French public," added manager Jo Maso. "Let them remember that it was when we were 43-3 ahead that the Irish supporters started to sing. We would very much like to have the same support from the French public."

Michalak, a brilliant but frustrating talent, has been dropped by Laporte in the past and the French coach warned before the game that his number 10 and the rest of the panel needed to step up to the plate if they were to avoid the fate of those players culled after the Scottish defeat.

"It's true that he alternated the good and the not-so-good," admitted the 42-year-old. "Personally I'm satisfied with his performance. Above all, I want to back him and support him, unlike some elements of the public."

The French may have secured their first victory of this Six Nations Championship but few will have been convinced by the performance or their fitness levels.

Laporte admitted Ireland were far the fitter team as the last quarter grew legs, but he was at a loss to explain why pointing the finger indirectly at the workload of the domestic league.

"I'm not really qualified to say why they were physically fitter than us. What we do when we have the team together isn't mainly physical work.

"The Irish are probably the most club-like team in Europe and maybe the world, in that they're always working together, doing little courses together. Beyond that I'm not sure what the answer is."

Laporte admitted watching the last 30 minutes of the game was like a nightmare or watching a film, but was adamant that there was more positives than negatives from the day's work.

Jo Maso was more forthcoming with his concerns. "When you're up against world-class centres like D'Arcy and O'Driscoll, it's difficult when you keep handing the ball back to them. The other point is that, when 40 points down, they were basically fearless.

"They had nothing to lose so that probably pushed them to come back.

"We did crack in the last few minutes and if it had gone on another 10 minutes we would have been in trouble."