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Roche casts doubt on Roadstone dump denial

Dick Roche Europe Minister

By Michael O’Farrell Political Reporter
ENVIRONMENT Minister Dick Roche last night challenged Roadstone’s assertion that it never knew more than 50,000 tonnes of illegal and partially hazardous waste had been dumped on its land in Wicklow.

Speaking after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) refused a Roadstone application for a landfill licence at the site, Mr Roche said he had very little sympathy for the fact that the company would now have to pay millions to locate the waste in legal landfills elsewhere.

"I simply find it so difficult to accept the excuse that nobody knew. 50,000 tonnes of waste is a lot of material and it’s very, very hard to see how that could have gone on without somebody in the company knowing about it," he said.

Roadstone - a fully owned subsidiary of Irish firm Cement Roadstone Holdings which made a profit of e1 billion last year - has always denied any knowledge of illegal dumping on the Glen Ding quarry site near Blessington.

Local councillors and national politicians have greeted such claims with incredulity given the scale of the dumps, which extend to 50 feet deep.

Mr Roche said: "It’s a good day for people who are bothered by illegal dumping - and people should be bothered by illegal dumping."

The decision comes more than four years after the waste was discovered and clears the way for three massive dumps to be cleaned.

Some estimates put the illegal dumps at four times the acknowledged 50,000 tonnes, but EPO deputy director general Padraig Larkin said it was impossible to measure the quantity of waste until it is removed.

He said Roadstone would have to foot the bill for extraction, haulage and gate fees to legitimate landfills to put the waste "where it should have gone in the first instance. We would hope that all the material will be gone off the site by the end of the summer," he said.

A Roadstone spokesman said: "Since the waste was first discovered, Roadstone has consistently indicated to both Wicklow County Council and the EPA that it would commence the clean-up once permitted to do so, even though the waste was put there without the knowledge or consent of the company."

Meanwhile, the EPA is set to decide by the end of this month on an application by Brownfield Restoration Ltd for a similar landfill licence for another illegal Wicklow dump in Whitestown.

 

Roche casts doubt on Roadstone dump denial

Dick Roche Europe Minister

By Michael O’Farrell Political Reporter
ENVIRONMENT Minister Dick Roche last night challenged Roadstone’s assertion that it never knew more than 50,000 tonnes of illegal and partially hazardous waste had been dumped on its land in Wicklow.

Speaking after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) refused a Roadstone application for a landfill licence at the site, Mr Roche said he had very little sympathy for the fact that the company would now have to pay millions to locate the waste in legal landfills elsewhere.

"I simply find it so difficult to accept the excuse that nobody knew. 50,000 tonnes of waste is a lot of material and it’s very, very hard to see how that could have gone on without somebody in the company knowing about it," he said.

Roadstone - a fully owned subsidiary of Irish firm Cement Roadstone Holdings which made a profit of e1 billion last year - has always denied any knowledge of illegal dumping on the Glen Ding quarry site near Blessington.

Local councillors and national politicians have greeted such claims with incredulity given the scale of the dumps, which extend to 50 feet deep.

Mr Roche said: "It’s a good day for people who are bothered by illegal dumping - and people should be bothered by illegal dumping."

The decision comes more than four years after the waste was discovered and clears the way for three massive dumps to be cleaned.

Some estimates put the illegal dumps at four times the acknowledged 50,000 tonnes, but EPO deputy director general Padraig Larkin said it was impossible to measure the quantity of waste until it is removed.

He said Roadstone would have to foot the bill for extraction, haulage and gate fees to legitimate landfills to put the waste "where it should have gone in the first instance. We would hope that all the material will be gone off the site by the end of the summer," he said.

A Roadstone spokesman said: "Since the waste was first discovered, Roadstone has consistently indicated to both Wicklow County Council and the EPA that it would commence the clean-up once permitted to do so, even though the waste was put there without the knowledge or consent of the company."

Meanwhile, the EPA is set to decide by the end of this month on an application by Brownfield Restoration Ltd for a similar landfill licence for another illegal Wicklow dump in Whitestown.

 

Roche casts doubt on Roadstone dump denial

Dick Roche Europe Minister

By Michael O’Farrell Political Reporter
ENVIRONMENT Minister Dick Roche last night challenged Roadstone’s assertion that it never knew more than 50,000 tonnes of illegal and partially hazardous waste had been dumped on its land in Wicklow.

Speaking after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) refused a Roadstone application for a landfill licence at the site, Mr Roche said he had very little sympathy for the fact that the company would now have to pay millions to locate the waste in legal landfills elsewhere.

"I simply find it so difficult to accept the excuse that nobody knew. 50,000 tonnes of waste is a lot of material and it’s very, very hard to see how that could have gone on without somebody in the company knowing about it," he said.

Roadstone - a fully owned subsidiary of Irish firm Cement Roadstone Holdings which made a profit of e1 billion last year - has always denied any knowledge of illegal dumping on the Glen Ding quarry site near Blessington.

Local councillors and national politicians have greeted such claims with incredulity given the scale of the dumps, which extend to 50 feet deep.

Mr Roche said: "It’s a good day for people who are bothered by illegal dumping - and people should be bothered by illegal dumping."

The decision comes more than four years after the waste was discovered and clears the way for three massive dumps to be cleaned.

Some estimates put the illegal dumps at four times the acknowledged 50,000 tonnes, but EPO deputy director general Padraig Larkin said it was impossible to measure the quantity of waste until it is removed.

He said Roadstone would have to foot the bill for extraction, haulage and gate fees to legitimate landfills to put the waste "where it should have gone in the first instance. We would hope that all the material will be gone off the site by the end of the summer," he said.

A Roadstone spokesman said: "Since the waste was first discovered, Roadstone has consistently indicated to both Wicklow County Council and the EPA that it would commence the clean-up once permitted to do so, even though the waste was put there without the knowledge or consent of the company."

Meanwhile, the EPA is set to decide by the end of this month on an application by Brownfield Restoration Ltd for a similar landfill licence for another illegal Wicklow dump in Whitestown.

 

Roche casts doubt on Roadstone dump denial

Dick Roche Europe Minister

By Michael O’Farrell Political Reporter
ENVIRONMENT Minister Dick Roche last night challenged Roadstone’s assertion that it never knew more than 50,000 tonnes of illegal and partially hazardous waste had been dumped on its land in Wicklow.

Speaking after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) refused a Roadstone application for a landfill licence at the site, Mr Roche said he had very little sympathy for the fact that the company would now have to pay millions to locate the waste in legal landfills elsewhere.

"I simply find it so difficult to accept the excuse that nobody knew. 50,000 tonnes of waste is a lot of material and it’s very, very hard to see how that could have gone on without somebody in the company knowing about it," he said.

Roadstone - a fully owned subsidiary of Irish firm Cement Roadstone Holdings which made a profit of e1 billion last year - has always denied any knowledge of illegal dumping on the Glen Ding quarry site near Blessington.

Local councillors and national politicians have greeted such claims with incredulity given the scale of the dumps, which extend to 50 feet deep.

Mr Roche said: "It’s a good day for people who are bothered by illegal dumping - and people should be bothered by illegal dumping."

The decision comes more than four years after the waste was discovered and clears the way for three massive dumps to be cleaned.

Some estimates put the illegal dumps at four times the acknowledged 50,000 tonnes, but EPO deputy director general Padraig Larkin said it was impossible to measure the quantity of waste until it is removed.

He said Roadstone would have to foot the bill for extraction, haulage and gate fees to legitimate landfills to put the waste "where it should have gone in the first instance. We would hope that all the material will be gone off the site by the end of the summer," he said.

A Roadstone spokesman said: "Since the waste was first discovered, Roadstone has consistently indicated to both Wicklow County Council and the EPA that it would commence the clean-up once permitted to do so, even though the waste was put there without the knowledge or consent of the company."

Meanwhile, the EPA is set to decide by the end of this month on an application by Brownfield Restoration Ltd for a similar landfill licence for another illegal Wicklow dump in Whitestown.