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Appeal of the Orient

Mori House

By Rose Martin
JAPANESE principles of design and an Irish sensibility are the key elements in the creation of Mori House, near Aghadoe, Killarney.

The name is Japanese, meaning a woodland place, and the ex-pat Sika deer come down from the hills above to graze on the grounds of Killarney Golf Course at Lackabane.

The Dublin 4 of 'Beauty's Home', this area has some large, impressive houses, but what makes Mori House stand out is its oriental simplicity.

And in contrast to the ubiquitous dormer, the roof is hipped because the owner 'doesn't like gables'. This is partly because of aesthetic considerations, but also because it doesn't make ecological sense to offer an obstruction to the prevailing southwesterlies, he says.

By the same token, Mori makes the most of the southwest orientation with a large, conservatory entrance hall that acts as a passive solar heater. Because there are no corridors as such, all the living rooms interconnect, with access off the main entrance hallway. Large windows and patio doors make the most of the aspect, bright marble floors reflect the ambient light and underfloor heating adds an element of cosiness.

And the vendor himself, who is also the builder/ designer, sourced most of the materials for this house. The marble was bought from a Turkish national whose family own the quarry and the Burren boulders and stone in the garden were transported from Clare. The ordeal, as he describes it, has helped turn almost an acre of mountain into a work of art.

The Grohe bathroom fittings came from abroad (where they are a lot cheaper) and the extra touches in the kitchen, like the lighting and curved canopy, were ordered from Italy.

The old pitch pine staircase, meanwhile, came straight out of his old school, the Mercy Convent in Milltown.

A five-year project, the house and gardens offer a little bit of calm in a busy world. Simple but sumptuous, Mori House has 2,600 square feet divided between five bedrooms, a lounge, family room, kitchen and conservatory/dining room.

Add to that a 1,300 sq ft external building which is divided into a gym area with plumbed utility/ bathroom, a garage and a store. The overhead storage space also has conversion potential.

At first glance, Mori House is unpretentious but there's plenty of thought behind the finished product. The combination of the location (there are distant views of the Lakes of Killarney), the privacy, the woodland setting and the quality of the build means there shouldn't be any surprise about the guide price of €1.2 million.

Killarney has some of the best properties in the county, but it also has some of the highest prices. This is the first of the new season's pickings.

Michael Coghlan of Sherry FitzGerald Coghlan is the selling agent for Mori House.

 

Appeal of the Orient

Mori House

By Rose Martin
JAPANESE principles of design and an Irish sensibility are the key elements in the creation of Mori House, near Aghadoe, Killarney.

The name is Japanese, meaning a woodland place, and the ex-pat Sika deer come down from the hills above to graze on the grounds of Killarney Golf Course at Lackabane.

The Dublin 4 of 'Beauty's Home', this area has some large, impressive houses, but what makes Mori House stand out is its oriental simplicity.

And in contrast to the ubiquitous dormer, the roof is hipped because the owner 'doesn't like gables'. This is partly because of aesthetic considerations, but also because it doesn't make ecological sense to offer an obstruction to the prevailing southwesterlies, he says.

By the same token, Mori makes the most of the southwest orientation with a large, conservatory entrance hall that acts as a passive solar heater. Because there are no corridors as such, all the living rooms interconnect, with access off the main entrance hallway. Large windows and patio doors make the most of the aspect, bright marble floors reflect the ambient light and underfloor heating adds an element of cosiness.

And the vendor himself, who is also the builder/ designer, sourced most of the materials for this house. The marble was bought from a Turkish national whose family own the quarry and the Burren boulders and stone in the garden were transported from Clare. The ordeal, as he describes it, has helped turn almost an acre of mountain into a work of art.

The Grohe bathroom fittings came from abroad (where they are a lot cheaper) and the extra touches in the kitchen, like the lighting and curved canopy, were ordered from Italy.

The old pitch pine staircase, meanwhile, came straight out of his old school, the Mercy Convent in Milltown.

A five-year project, the house and gardens offer a little bit of calm in a busy world. Simple but sumptuous, Mori House has 2,600 square feet divided between five bedrooms, a lounge, family room, kitchen and conservatory/dining room.

Add to that a 1,300 sq ft external building which is divided into a gym area with plumbed utility/ bathroom, a garage and a store. The overhead storage space also has conversion potential.

At first glance, Mori House is unpretentious but there's plenty of thought behind the finished product. The combination of the location (there are distant views of the Lakes of Killarney), the privacy, the woodland setting and the quality of the build means there shouldn't be any surprise about the guide price of €1.2 million.

Killarney has some of the best properties in the county, but it also has some of the highest prices. This is the first of the new season's pickings.

Michael Coghlan of Sherry FitzGerald Coghlan is the selling agent for Mori House.

 

Appeal of the Orient

Mori House

By Rose Martin
JAPANESE principles of design and an Irish sensibility are the key elements in the creation of Mori House, near Aghadoe, Killarney.

The name is Japanese, meaning a woodland place, and the ex-pat Sika deer come down from the hills above to graze on the grounds of Killarney Golf Course at Lackabane.

The Dublin 4 of 'Beauty's Home', this area has some large, impressive houses, but what makes Mori House stand out is its oriental simplicity.

And in contrast to the ubiquitous dormer, the roof is hipped because the owner 'doesn't like gables'. This is partly because of aesthetic considerations, but also because it doesn't make ecological sense to offer an obstruction to the prevailing southwesterlies, he says.

By the same token, Mori makes the most of the southwest orientation with a large, conservatory entrance hall that acts as a passive solar heater. Because there are no corridors as such, all the living rooms interconnect, with access off the main entrance hallway. Large windows and patio doors make the most of the aspect, bright marble floors reflect the ambient light and underfloor heating adds an element of cosiness.

And the vendor himself, who is also the builder/ designer, sourced most of the materials for this house. The marble was bought from a Turkish national whose family own the quarry and the Burren boulders and stone in the garden were transported from Clare. The ordeal, as he describes it, has helped turn almost an acre of mountain into a work of art.

The Grohe bathroom fittings came from abroad (where they are a lot cheaper) and the extra touches in the kitchen, like the lighting and curved canopy, were ordered from Italy.

The old pitch pine staircase, meanwhile, came straight out of his old school, the Mercy Convent in Milltown.

A five-year project, the house and gardens offer a little bit of calm in a busy world. Simple but sumptuous, Mori House has 2,600 square feet divided between five bedrooms, a lounge, family room, kitchen and conservatory/dining room.

Add to that a 1,300 sq ft external building which is divided into a gym area with plumbed utility/ bathroom, a garage and a store. The overhead storage space also has conversion potential.

At first glance, Mori House is unpretentious but there's plenty of thought behind the finished product. The combination of the location (there are distant views of the Lakes of Killarney), the privacy, the woodland setting and the quality of the build means there shouldn't be any surprise about the guide price of €1.2 million.

Killarney has some of the best properties in the county, but it also has some of the highest prices. This is the first of the new season's pickings.

Michael Coghlan of Sherry FitzGerald Coghlan is the selling agent for Mori House.