You are viewing the content for Tuesday 7 February 2006

‘Lucky’ Russell was ref

hurling

By Colm O’Connor and Brendan O’Brien
REFEREES’ boss, Fr Seamus Gardiner, yesterday defended Paddy Russell’s handling of Sunday’s ill-tempered NFL clash between Tyrone and Dublin.

The game had a series of brawls, four dismissals and 14 yellow cards, but Fr Gardiner insisted the match official was powerless in the situation.

Said Fr Gardiner: "Nobody could referee a game that involves two teams who don’t want to play a game.

"We were lucky that, Paddy, one of our more experienced referees was doing the game. Paddy is a cool man under pressure. I am happy it wasn’t one of our younger referees, who we are introducing at a number of games through the league."

GAA president Sean Kelly also condemned the violent scenes.

In a significant personal intervention, Kelly said that the GAA was "annoyed" by Sunday’s scenes at Healy Park.

"Nobody wants to pre-empt the enquiry and nobody wants to apportion blame. A lot of what went on was totally unacceptable," said Kelly.

He said that the matter will be fully investigated by the CDC on receipt of the referee’s report and that he was confident the appropriate action would be taken. The worst incident happened after Dublin’s Alan Brogan had been sent off following a melee.

Brogan appeared to exchange words with a Tyrone mentor and a mass brawl involving players from both sides quickly broke out along the sideline.

Dublin’s Denis Bastick and Tyrone duo Stephen O’Neill and Colin Holmes were also sent off in the game.

Fr Gardiner added: "People say in hindsight that Paddy should have abandoned the game, but no referee wants to do that. I am surprised that this happened. I don’t know what the story behind it is but I am confident that the matter will be dealt with by the CDC. "The rules and regulations are there. I would defend Paddy from any blame when two teams take that kind of approach. When he was dealing with one issue, incidents were going on behind his back. Hopefully, something like this won’t happen again."

Meanwhile, Dublin county secretary John Costello has rejected the notion that Paul Caffrey’s team should shoulder more of the blame than Tyrone for the controversy.

After the match Tyrone manager Mickey Harte expressed disappointment at what had happened but he also seemed to suggest that it was the Leinster champions who should be the ones taking a long hard look in the mirror.

"All I can say is that that’s not the way we play the game," said Harte. "Since I’ve taken over Tyrone I’ve never advocated anything other than total football and that didn’t happen out there today.

"There were enough people there who can make their own value judgement on where it started and why it happened. I never pointed the finger of blame, all I’m saying is that the way we like to play this game is to concentrate solely on football, play it physically within the rules of the game."

Costello yesterday retorted: "Dublin will fully co-operate with any investigation. We are awaiting the referee’s report and will not comment on any individual cases. However, we strongly refute any suggestion that Dublin were the more culpable in any acts of indiscipline during the game."

Con Hogan, chairman of the Central Disciplinary Committee, has already confirmed that the body will examine TV footage if the referee’s report does not adequately deal with the brawls.

"We have to await the referee’s report. If an incident isn’t dealt with by the referee then we can use video evidence," Hogan confirmed.

 

‘Lucky’ Russell was ref

hurling

By Colm O’Connor and Brendan O’Brien
REFEREES’ boss, Fr Seamus Gardiner, yesterday defended Paddy Russell’s handling of Sunday’s ill-tempered NFL clash between Tyrone and Dublin.

The game had a series of brawls, four dismissals and 14 yellow cards, but Fr Gardiner insisted the match official was powerless in the situation.

Said Fr Gardiner: "Nobody could referee a game that involves two teams who don’t want to play a game.

"We were lucky that, Paddy, one of our more experienced referees was doing the game. Paddy is a cool man under pressure. I am happy it wasn’t one of our younger referees, who we are introducing at a number of games through the league."

GAA president Sean Kelly also condemned the violent scenes.

In a significant personal intervention, Kelly said that the GAA was "annoyed" by Sunday’s scenes at Healy Park.

"Nobody wants to pre-empt the enquiry and nobody wants to apportion blame. A lot of what went on was totally unacceptable," said Kelly.

He said that the matter will be fully investigated by the CDC on receipt of the referee’s report and that he was confident the appropriate action would be taken. The worst incident happened after Dublin’s Alan Brogan had been sent off following a melee.

Brogan appeared to exchange words with a Tyrone mentor and a mass brawl involving players from both sides quickly broke out along the sideline.

Dublin’s Denis Bastick and Tyrone duo Stephen O’Neill and Colin Holmes were also sent off in the game.

Fr Gardiner added: "People say in hindsight that Paddy should have abandoned the game, but no referee wants to do that. I am surprised that this happened. I don’t know what the story behind it is but I am confident that the matter will be dealt with by the CDC. "The rules and regulations are there. I would defend Paddy from any blame when two teams take that kind of approach. When he was dealing with one issue, incidents were going on behind his back. Hopefully, something like this won’t happen again."

Meanwhile, Dublin county secretary John Costello has rejected the notion that Paul Caffrey’s team should shoulder more of the blame than Tyrone for the controversy.

After the match Tyrone manager Mickey Harte expressed disappointment at what had happened but he also seemed to suggest that it was the Leinster champions who should be the ones taking a long hard look in the mirror.

"All I can say is that that’s not the way we play the game," said Harte. "Since I’ve taken over Tyrone I’ve never advocated anything other than total football and that didn’t happen out there today.

"There were enough people there who can make their own value judgement on where it started and why it happened. I never pointed the finger of blame, all I’m saying is that the way we like to play this game is to concentrate solely on football, play it physically within the rules of the game."

Costello yesterday retorted: "Dublin will fully co-operate with any investigation. We are awaiting the referee’s report and will not comment on any individual cases. However, we strongly refute any suggestion that Dublin were the more culpable in any acts of indiscipline during the game."

Con Hogan, chairman of the Central Disciplinary Committee, has already confirmed that the body will examine TV footage if the referee’s report does not adequately deal with the brawls.

"We have to await the referee’s report. If an incident isn’t dealt with by the referee then we can use video evidence," Hogan confirmed.

 

‘Lucky’ Russell was ref

hurling

By Colm O’Connor and Brendan O’Brien
REFEREES’ boss, Fr Seamus Gardiner, yesterday defended Paddy Russell’s handling of Sunday’s ill-tempered NFL clash between Tyrone and Dublin.

The game had a series of brawls, four dismissals and 14 yellow cards, but Fr Gardiner insisted the match official was powerless in the situation.

Said Fr Gardiner: "Nobody could referee a game that involves two teams who don’t want to play a game.

"We were lucky that, Paddy, one of our more experienced referees was doing the game. Paddy is a cool man under pressure. I am happy it wasn’t one of our younger referees, who we are introducing at a number of games through the league."

GAA president Sean Kelly also condemned the violent scenes.

In a significant personal intervention, Kelly said that the GAA was "annoyed" by Sunday’s scenes at Healy Park.

"Nobody wants to pre-empt the enquiry and nobody wants to apportion blame. A lot of what went on was totally unacceptable," said Kelly.

He said that the matter will be fully investigated by the CDC on receipt of the referee’s report and that he was confident the appropriate action would be taken. The worst incident happened after Dublin’s Alan Brogan had been sent off following a melee.

Brogan appeared to exchange words with a Tyrone mentor and a mass brawl involving players from both sides quickly broke out along the sideline.

Dublin’s Denis Bastick and Tyrone duo Stephen O’Neill and Colin Holmes were also sent off in the game.

Fr Gardiner added: "People say in hindsight that Paddy should have abandoned the game, but no referee wants to do that. I am surprised that this happened. I don’t know what the story behind it is but I am confident that the matter will be dealt with by the CDC. "The rules and regulations are there. I would defend Paddy from any blame when two teams take that kind of approach. When he was dealing with one issue, incidents were going on behind his back. Hopefully, something like this won’t happen again."

Meanwhile, Dublin county secretary John Costello has rejected the notion that Paul Caffrey’s team should shoulder more of the blame than Tyrone for the controversy.

After the match Tyrone manager Mickey Harte expressed disappointment at what had happened but he also seemed to suggest that it was the Leinster champions who should be the ones taking a long hard look in the mirror.

"All I can say is that that’s not the way we play the game," said Harte. "Since I’ve taken over Tyrone I’ve never advocated anything other than total football and that didn’t happen out there today.

"There were enough people there who can make their own value judgement on where it started and why it happened. I never pointed the finger of blame, all I’m saying is that the way we like to play this game is to concentrate solely on football, play it physically within the rules of the game."

Costello yesterday retorted: "Dublin will fully co-operate with any investigation. We are awaiting the referee’s report and will not comment on any individual cases. However, we strongly refute any suggestion that Dublin were the more culpable in any acts of indiscipline during the game."

Con Hogan, chairman of the Central Disciplinary Committee, has already confirmed that the body will examine TV footage if the referee’s report does not adequately deal with the brawls.

"We have to await the referee’s report. If an incident isn’t dealt with by the referee then we can use video evidence," Hogan confirmed.

 

‘Lucky’ Russell was ref

hurling

By Colm O’Connor and Brendan O’Brien
REFEREES’ boss, Fr Seamus Gardiner, yesterday defended Paddy Russell’s handling of Sunday’s ill-tempered NFL clash between Tyrone and Dublin.

The game had a series of brawls, four dismissals and 14 yellow cards, but Fr Gardiner insisted the match official was powerless in the situation.

Said Fr Gardiner: "Nobody could referee a game that involves two teams who don’t want to play a game.

"We were lucky that, Paddy, one of our more experienced referees was doing the game. Paddy is a cool man under pressure. I am happy it wasn’t one of our younger referees, who we are introducing at a number of games through the league."

GAA president Sean Kelly also condemned the violent scenes.

In a significant personal intervention, Kelly said that the GAA was "annoyed" by Sunday’s scenes at Healy Park.

"Nobody wants to pre-empt the enquiry and nobody wants to apportion blame. A lot of what went on was totally unacceptable," said Kelly.

He said that the matter will be fully investigated by the CDC on receipt of the referee’s report and that he was confident the appropriate action would be taken. The worst incident happened after Dublin’s Alan Brogan had been sent off following a melee.

Brogan appeared to exchange words with a Tyrone mentor and a mass brawl involving players from both sides quickly broke out along the sideline.

Dublin’s Denis Bastick and Tyrone duo Stephen O’Neill and Colin Holmes were also sent off in the game.

Fr Gardiner added: "People say in hindsight that Paddy should have abandoned the game, but no referee wants to do that. I am surprised that this happened. I don’t know what the story behind it is but I am confident that the matter will be dealt with by the CDC. "The rules and regulations are there. I would defend Paddy from any blame when two teams take that kind of approach. When he was dealing with one issue, incidents were going on behind his back. Hopefully, something like this won’t happen again."

Meanwhile, Dublin county secretary John Costello has rejected the notion that Paul Caffrey’s team should shoulder more of the blame than Tyrone for the controversy.

After the match Tyrone manager Mickey Harte expressed disappointment at what had happened but he also seemed to suggest that it was the Leinster champions who should be the ones taking a long hard look in the mirror.

"All I can say is that that’s not the way we play the game," said Harte. "Since I’ve taken over Tyrone I’ve never advocated anything other than total football and that didn’t happen out there today.

"There were enough people there who can make their own value judgement on where it started and why it happened. I never pointed the finger of blame, all I’m saying is that the way we like to play this game is to concentrate solely on football, play it physically within the rules of the game."

Costello yesterday retorted: "Dublin will fully co-operate with any investigation. We are awaiting the referee’s report and will not comment on any individual cases. However, we strongly refute any suggestion that Dublin were the more culpable in any acts of indiscipline during the game."

Con Hogan, chairman of the Central Disciplinary Committee, has already confirmed that the body will examine TV footage if the referee’s report does not adequately deal with the brawls.

"We have to await the referee’s report. If an incident isn’t dealt with by the referee then we can use video evidence," Hogan confirmed.

 

‘Lucky’ Russell was ref

hurling

By Colm O’Connor and Brendan O’Brien
REFEREES’ boss, Fr Seamus Gardiner, yesterday defended Paddy Russell’s handling of Sunday’s ill-tempered NFL clash between Tyrone and Dublin.

The game had a series of brawls, four dismissals and 14 yellow cards, but Fr Gardiner insisted the match official was powerless in the situation.

Said Fr Gardiner: "Nobody could referee a game that involves two teams who don’t want to play a game.

"We were lucky that, Paddy, one of our more experienced referees was doing the game. Paddy is a cool man under pressure. I am happy it wasn’t one of our younger referees, who we are introducing at a number of games through the league."

GAA president Sean Kelly also condemned the violent scenes.

In a significant personal intervention, Kelly said that the GAA was "annoyed" by Sunday’s scenes at Healy Park.

"Nobody wants to pre-empt the enquiry and nobody wants to apportion blame. A lot of what went on was totally unacceptable," said Kelly.

He said that the matter will be fully investigated by the CDC on receipt of the referee’s report and that he was confident the appropriate action would be taken. The worst incident happened after Dublin’s Alan Brogan had been sent off following a melee.

Brogan appeared to exchange words with a Tyrone mentor and a mass brawl involving players from both sides quickly broke out along the sideline.

Dublin’s Denis Bastick and Tyrone duo Stephen O’Neill and Colin Holmes were also sent off in the game.

Fr Gardiner added: "People say in hindsight that Paddy should have abandoned the game, but no referee wants to do that. I am surprised that this happened. I don’t know what the story behind it is but I am confident that the matter will be dealt with by the CDC. "The rules and regulations are there. I would defend Paddy from any blame when two teams take that kind of approach. When he was dealing with one issue, incidents were going on behind his back. Hopefully, something like this won’t happen again."

Meanwhile, Dublin county secretary John Costello has rejected the notion that Paul Caffrey’s team should shoulder more of the blame than Tyrone for the controversy.

After the match Tyrone manager Mickey Harte expressed disappointment at what had happened but he also seemed to suggest that it was the Leinster champions who should be the ones taking a long hard look in the mirror.

"All I can say is that that’s not the way we play the game," said Harte. "Since I’ve taken over Tyrone I’ve never advocated anything other than total football and that didn’t happen out there today.

"There were enough people there who can make their own value judgement on where it started and why it happened. I never pointed the finger of blame, all I’m saying is that the way we like to play this game is to concentrate solely on football, play it physically within the rules of the game."

Costello yesterday retorted: "Dublin will fully co-operate with any investigation. We are awaiting the referee’s report and will not comment on any individual cases. However, we strongly refute any suggestion that Dublin were the more culpable in any acts of indiscipline during the game."

Con Hogan, chairman of the Central Disciplinary Committee, has already confirmed that the body will examine TV footage if the referee’s report does not adequately deal with the brawls.

"We have to await the referee’s report. If an incident isn’t dealt with by the referee then we can use video evidence," Hogan confirmed.

 

‘Lucky’ Russell was ref

hurling

By Colm O’Connor and Brendan O’Brien
REFEREES’ boss, Fr Seamus Gardiner, yesterday defended Paddy Russell’s handling of Sunday’s ill-tempered NFL clash between Tyrone and Dublin.

The game had a series of brawls, four dismissals and 14 yellow cards, but Fr Gardiner insisted the match official was powerless in the situation.

Said Fr Gardiner: "Nobody could referee a game that involves two teams who don’t want to play a game.

"We were lucky that, Paddy, one of our more experienced referees was doing the game. Paddy is a cool man under pressure. I am happy it wasn’t one of our younger referees, who we are introducing at a number of games through the league."

GAA president Sean Kelly also condemned the violent scenes.

In a significant personal intervention, Kelly said that the GAA was "annoyed" by Sunday’s scenes at Healy Park.

"Nobody wants to pre-empt the enquiry and nobody wants to apportion blame. A lot of what went on was totally unacceptable," said Kelly.

He said that the matter will be fully investigated by the CDC on receipt of the referee’s report and that he was confident the appropriate action would be taken. The worst incident happened after Dublin’s Alan Brogan had been sent off following a melee.

Brogan appeared to exchange words with a Tyrone mentor and a mass brawl involving players from both sides quickly broke out along the sideline.

Dublin’s Denis Bastick and Tyrone duo Stephen O’Neill and Colin Holmes were also sent off in the game.

Fr Gardiner added: "People say in hindsight that Paddy should have abandoned the game, but no referee wants to do that. I am surprised that this happened. I don’t know what the story behind it is but I am confident that the matter will be dealt with by the CDC. "The rules and regulations are there. I would defend Paddy from any blame when two teams take that kind of approach. When he was dealing with one issue, incidents were going on behind his back. Hopefully, something like this won’t happen again."

Meanwhile, Dublin county secretary John Costello has rejected the notion that Paul Caffrey’s team should shoulder more of the blame than Tyrone for the controversy.

After the match Tyrone manager Mickey Harte expressed disappointment at what had happened but he also seemed to suggest that it was the Leinster champions who should be the ones taking a long hard look in the mirror.

"All I can say is that that’s not the way we play the game," said Harte. "Since I’ve taken over Tyrone I’ve never advocated anything other than total football and that didn’t happen out there today.

"There were enough people there who can make their own value judgement on where it started and why it happened. I never pointed the finger of blame, all I’m saying is that the way we like to play this game is to concentrate solely on football, play it physically within the rules of the game."

Costello yesterday retorted: "Dublin will fully co-operate with any investigation. We are awaiting the referee’s report and will not comment on any individual cases. However, we strongly refute any suggestion that Dublin were the more culpable in any acts of indiscipline during the game."

Con Hogan, chairman of the Central Disciplinary Committee, has already confirmed that the body will examine TV footage if the referee’s report does not adequately deal with the brawls.

"We have to await the referee’s report. If an incident isn’t dealt with by the referee then we can use video evidence," Hogan confirmed.