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Public sector pay hikes twice inflation rate

CSO

By Ian Guider
PAY increases in the public sector are running at nearly twice the rate of inflation, figures from the Central Statistics Office show.

Average weekly earnings in the public sector rose 5.7% in the year to September 2005.

The increase is almost twice the rate of inflation and higher than the pay rises agreed under the last national wage agreement.

Average weekly earnings were €848.87 at the end of last September compared to €803.45 in the same period in 2004.

According to the CSO data, gardaí are the highest paid public workers, with average weekly earnings of €1,090.64. This is equivalent to just under €57,000 a year - nearly twice the rate of the average industrial worker, business groups said yesterday. Over the past five years, garda pay has risen by more than €100 a week.

Earnings for prison officers, including overtime, decreased from €1,142.94 to €1,061.88, reflecting attempts to reduce the overtime bill.

Pay in the semi-state sector has risen from €728.23 a week in 2001 to €901.53.

The wages of teachers, have also increased between 2001 and 2005. The average weekly wage for a secondary school teacher has gone from €761.91 to €960 a week. Primary teachers’ weekly earnings are up from €729.66 to €820.90.

Small firms’ group ISME said the increases meant workers in the public sector were earning nearly 50% more than those in the private sector.

ISME chief executive Mark Fielding said the figures also proved that the basis for benchmarking payments (that public workers earned less than the private sector) was false.

"The comparison between the public and private sectors is a nonsense when their insulated jobs for life, extended holidays and indexed pension entitlements are taken into account."

Mr Fielding said benchmarking was a "scam" costing taxpayers €1.2 billion more a year. The CSO also said yesterday that the number of people employed in the public sector increased by 4,100 in the three months to end September to 243,300.

Mr Fielding added: "Not only have we failed to see real gains from the public sector, but also we have been rewarded with an additional 18,000 public servants since 2002... when we were promised a reduction of 5,000."

 

Public sector pay hikes twice inflation rate

CSO

By Ian Guider
PAY increases in the public sector are running at nearly twice the rate of inflation, figures from the Central Statistics Office show.

Average weekly earnings in the public sector rose 5.7% in the year to September 2005.

The increase is almost twice the rate of inflation and higher than the pay rises agreed under the last national wage agreement.

Average weekly earnings were €848.87 at the end of last September compared to €803.45 in the same period in 2004.

According to the CSO data, gardaí are the highest paid public workers, with average weekly earnings of €1,090.64. This is equivalent to just under €57,000 a year - nearly twice the rate of the average industrial worker, business groups said yesterday. Over the past five years, garda pay has risen by more than €100 a week.

Earnings for prison officers, including overtime, decreased from €1,142.94 to €1,061.88, reflecting attempts to reduce the overtime bill.

Pay in the semi-state sector has risen from €728.23 a week in 2001 to €901.53.

The wages of teachers, have also increased between 2001 and 2005. The average weekly wage for a secondary school teacher has gone from €761.91 to €960 a week. Primary teachers’ weekly earnings are up from €729.66 to €820.90.

Small firms’ group ISME said the increases meant workers in the public sector were earning nearly 50% more than those in the private sector.

ISME chief executive Mark Fielding said the figures also proved that the basis for benchmarking payments (that public workers earned less than the private sector) was false.

"The comparison between the public and private sectors is a nonsense when their insulated jobs for life, extended holidays and indexed pension entitlements are taken into account."

Mr Fielding said benchmarking was a "scam" costing taxpayers €1.2 billion more a year. The CSO also said yesterday that the number of people employed in the public sector increased by 4,100 in the three months to end September to 243,300.

Mr Fielding added: "Not only have we failed to see real gains from the public sector, but also we have been rewarded with an additional 18,000 public servants since 2002... when we were promised a reduction of 5,000."

 

Public sector pay hikes twice inflation rate

CSO

By Ian Guider
PAY increases in the public sector are running at nearly twice the rate of inflation, figures from the Central Statistics Office show.

Average weekly earnings in the public sector rose 5.7% in the year to September 2005.

The increase is almost twice the rate of inflation and higher than the pay rises agreed under the last national wage agreement.

Average weekly earnings were €848.87 at the end of last September compared to €803.45 in the same period in 2004.

According to the CSO data, gardaí are the highest paid public workers, with average weekly earnings of €1,090.64. This is equivalent to just under €57,000 a year - nearly twice the rate of the average industrial worker, business groups said yesterday. Over the past five years, garda pay has risen by more than €100 a week.

Earnings for prison officers, including overtime, decreased from €1,142.94 to €1,061.88, reflecting attempts to reduce the overtime bill.

Pay in the semi-state sector has risen from €728.23 a week in 2001 to €901.53.

The wages of teachers, have also increased between 2001 and 2005. The average weekly wage for a secondary school teacher has gone from €761.91 to €960 a week. Primary teachers’ weekly earnings are up from €729.66 to €820.90.

Small firms’ group ISME said the increases meant workers in the public sector were earning nearly 50% more than those in the private sector.

ISME chief executive Mark Fielding said the figures also proved that the basis for benchmarking payments (that public workers earned less than the private sector) was false.

"The comparison between the public and private sectors is a nonsense when their insulated jobs for life, extended holidays and indexed pension entitlements are taken into account."

Mr Fielding said benchmarking was a "scam" costing taxpayers €1.2 billion more a year. The CSO also said yesterday that the number of people employed in the public sector increased by 4,100 in the three months to end September to 243,300.

Mr Fielding added: "Not only have we failed to see real gains from the public sector, but also we have been rewarded with an additional 18,000 public servants since 2002... when we were promised a reduction of 5,000."

 

Public sector pay hikes twice inflation rate

CSO

By Ian Guider
PAY increases in the public sector are running at nearly twice the rate of inflation, figures from the Central Statistics Office show.

Average weekly earnings in the public sector rose 5.7% in the year to September 2005.

The increase is almost twice the rate of inflation and higher than the pay rises agreed under the last national wage agreement.

Average weekly earnings were €848.87 at the end of last September compared to €803.45 in the same period in 2004.

According to the CSO data, gardaí are the highest paid public workers, with average weekly earnings of €1,090.64. This is equivalent to just under €57,000 a year - nearly twice the rate of the average industrial worker, business groups said yesterday. Over the past five years, garda pay has risen by more than €100 a week.

Earnings for prison officers, including overtime, decreased from €1,142.94 to €1,061.88, reflecting attempts to reduce the overtime bill.

Pay in the semi-state sector has risen from €728.23 a week in 2001 to €901.53.

The wages of teachers, have also increased between 2001 and 2005. The average weekly wage for a secondary school teacher has gone from €761.91 to €960 a week. Primary teachers’ weekly earnings are up from €729.66 to €820.90.

Small firms’ group ISME said the increases meant workers in the public sector were earning nearly 50% more than those in the private sector.

ISME chief executive Mark Fielding said the figures also proved that the basis for benchmarking payments (that public workers earned less than the private sector) was false.

"The comparison between the public and private sectors is a nonsense when their insulated jobs for life, extended holidays and indexed pension entitlements are taken into account."

Mr Fielding said benchmarking was a "scam" costing taxpayers €1.2 billion more a year. The CSO also said yesterday that the number of people employed in the public sector increased by 4,100 in the three months to end September to 243,300.

Mr Fielding added: "Not only have we failed to see real gains from the public sector, but also we have been rewarded with an additional 18,000 public servants since 2002... when we were promised a reduction of 5,000."