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Sudden end for EU's cattle live export subsidy

cattle ship

By Stephen Cadogan
SUBSIDIES for live cattle exports to countries outside the EU ceased at midnight on December 23.

The payments enabled the export of 11,690 cattle from Ireland to the Lebanon in 2004, and 9,874 in 2005, up to late December.

The export subsidy was worth €30 per 100kg, or €210 on a finished animal, and averaged €165 per head.

At the December 19 EU Council of Agriculture Ministers, the Danish delegation, supported by the British and Swedish delegations, welcomed a European Commission proposal to abolish the subsidies, on the grounds that a report of the Commission for the period from October 2003 to October 2004 showed serious violations of the animal welfare rules.

The Irish, Austrian, French, Spanish, Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Latvian, Luxembourg and Belgian delegations expressed their concerns at the proposal.

Given the EU commitment in World Trade Organisation talks to end all export support by 2013, these delegations pointed out that maintaining export subsidies in agriculture was crucial as part of future negotiations with exporting third countries, eliminating them would send the wrong signal to trade partners.

They also said that if EU operators withdrew from the live markets, exporters from third countries would immediately replace them with longer travel distances for the cattle exported from South America, and without any guarantees of the same strict animal welfare requirements imposed on EU exporters.

The German, Finnish and Dutch delegations supported keeping export refunds only for breeding animals. The Cypriot and Dutch delegations suggested to postpone this measure to next year.

Agriculture Commissioner Fischer-Boel said she had waited for the end of WTO talks in Hong Kong, before proposing to end export subsidies for live animals. She said the internal beef market was now positive with high prices since decoupling had been put in place, and consumption had largely recovered from the BSE crisis, so there was no longer a justification for the continuation of such support.

"The ending of the EU subsidies that fuelled this trade is a real victory for animal welfare", said Mary-Anne Bartlett, Director of the Compassion in World Farming (CIWF) farm animal welfare organisation.

 

Sudden end for EU's cattle live export subsidy

cattle ship

By Stephen Cadogan
SUBSIDIES for live cattle exports to countries outside the EU ceased at midnight on December 23.

The payments enabled the export of 11,690 cattle from Ireland to the Lebanon in 2004, and 9,874 in 2005, up to late December.

The export subsidy was worth €30 per 100kg, or €210 on a finished animal, and averaged €165 per head.

At the December 19 EU Council of Agriculture Ministers, the Danish delegation, supported by the British and Swedish delegations, welcomed a European Commission proposal to abolish the subsidies, on the grounds that a report of the Commission for the period from October 2003 to October 2004 showed serious violations of the animal welfare rules.

The Irish, Austrian, French, Spanish, Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Latvian, Luxembourg and Belgian delegations expressed their concerns at the proposal.

Given the EU commitment in World Trade Organisation talks to end all export support by 2013, these delegations pointed out that maintaining export subsidies in agriculture was crucial as part of future negotiations with exporting third countries, eliminating them would send the wrong signal to trade partners.

They also said that if EU operators withdrew from the live markets, exporters from third countries would immediately replace them with longer travel distances for the cattle exported from South America, and without any guarantees of the same strict animal welfare requirements imposed on EU exporters.

The German, Finnish and Dutch delegations supported keeping export refunds only for breeding animals. The Cypriot and Dutch delegations suggested to postpone this measure to next year.

Agriculture Commissioner Fischer-Boel said she had waited for the end of WTO talks in Hong Kong, before proposing to end export subsidies for live animals. She said the internal beef market was now positive with high prices since decoupling had been put in place, and consumption had largely recovered from the BSE crisis, so there was no longer a justification for the continuation of such support.

"The ending of the EU subsidies that fuelled this trade is a real victory for animal welfare", said Mary-Anne Bartlett, Director of the Compassion in World Farming (CIWF) farm animal welfare organisation.

 

Sudden end for EU's cattle live export subsidy

cattle ship

By Stephen Cadogan
SUBSIDIES for live cattle exports to countries outside the EU ceased at midnight on December 23.

The payments enabled the export of 11,690 cattle from Ireland to the Lebanon in 2004, and 9,874 in 2005, up to late December.

The export subsidy was worth €30 per 100kg, or €210 on a finished animal, and averaged €165 per head.

At the December 19 EU Council of Agriculture Ministers, the Danish delegation, supported by the British and Swedish delegations, welcomed a European Commission proposal to abolish the subsidies, on the grounds that a report of the Commission for the period from October 2003 to October 2004 showed serious violations of the animal welfare rules.

The Irish, Austrian, French, Spanish, Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Latvian, Luxembourg and Belgian delegations expressed their concerns at the proposal.

Given the EU commitment in World Trade Organisation talks to end all export support by 2013, these delegations pointed out that maintaining export subsidies in agriculture was crucial as part of future negotiations with exporting third countries, eliminating them would send the wrong signal to trade partners.

They also said that if EU operators withdrew from the live markets, exporters from third countries would immediately replace them with longer travel distances for the cattle exported from South America, and without any guarantees of the same strict animal welfare requirements imposed on EU exporters.

The German, Finnish and Dutch delegations supported keeping export refunds only for breeding animals. The Cypriot and Dutch delegations suggested to postpone this measure to next year.

Agriculture Commissioner Fischer-Boel said she had waited for the end of WTO talks in Hong Kong, before proposing to end export subsidies for live animals. She said the internal beef market was now positive with high prices since decoupling had been put in place, and consumption had largely recovered from the BSE crisis, so there was no longer a justification for the continuation of such support.

"The ending of the EU subsidies that fuelled this trade is a real victory for animal welfare", said Mary-Anne Bartlett, Director of the Compassion in World Farming (CIWF) farm animal welfare organisation.