You are viewing the content for Saturday 22 October 2005

Return to granny rule, says big Jack

former ireland soccer manager

By Brendan O’Brien
THE FAI needs to reactivate its interest in the ‘granny’ rule if Ireland are to recover the ground lost in the last two qualifying campaigns for major championships, according to former manager Jack Charlton.

The World Cup winner, in Dublin to promote the DVD ‘Jack Charlton - the Irish Years’, an era when the Geordie routinely capped players with tenuous links to the Republic.

"If you don’t use it you’re daft," said Charlton with typical bluntness yesterday in Dublin. "I got a lot of criticism about the players I brought in but you obey the rules. It is a fact that me and me brother (Bobby) could have played for Scotland because our grandmother was born in Dumfries.

"When I was manager we sent a letter around to all the football clubs and asked them to put it up on the boards, asking players who thought they were qualified and were interested in playing for Ireland to get in touch with the office here in Dublin."

It was in that matter that Charlton and his assistant Maurice Setters tracked down John Aldridge playing at Oxford and the Irish management team caught another lucky break at the Manor Ground when Aldridge informed them that a young midfielder called Ray Houghton had a father born in Donegal.

As it stands, Charlton sees some worrying times ahead for the country he managed for the best part of a decade. While the lack of a truly predatory striker would be top of most people’s Christmas lists, Charlton sees the biggest problem in the engine room.

"Roy Keane is going to be missed. We’ve got to get a few international class midfield players. We used to have them but we don’t now, apart from Damien (Duff) of course. We need somebody coming through who’s going to be an international star, maybe a couple."

Charlton’s old hot seat also needs filling and he believes the new man should be from Ireland or Britain and based in England.

"I think it’s difficult for an Irish manager if they live here. Brian Kerr must have been under a great deal of pressure trying to watch players because it’s a full-on job. You could be over and back three times a week. I lived in the north of England so I covered Scotland and the north and Maurice (Setters) covered the midlands and the south. That was how we found John Aldridge."

Whatever about the immediate future, Ireland’s long-term prospects are being seriously compromised by an alarming drop in technical ability, according to Liam Brady, Arsenal’s Head of Youth Development. He warned yesterday that, technically, Irish youths lag behind their English and European counterparts because of a failure on this island to coach children in the fundamentals from a young age.

"I know there’s great work being done in Ireland because I scout in Ireland, but I have to say that technically, the Irish kids are falling behind," was Brady’s assessment. "The boys coming from Ireland now are not as technically talented as boys from England or Europe. The FAI have to address that.

"It’s something that is evident in our national team. It takes money but the government and the various sporting bodies have got to be persuaded to release the purse strings."

The FAI’s Declan Conroy pointed out yesterday that their Emerging Talent Programme, which is being rolled out by Packie Bonner, is due to commence in 2006. The initiative is aimed at players in their later teens, but Brady has warned the FAI that similar academies abroad cater for eight-year-olds.

"Technique is probably the vital component in sport, whether it’s football or golf," stressed Brady. "Tiger Woods would have got his love of golf and maybe his dedication from his father but people taught him how to play. They taught him his technique. What I would like to see happen in Ireland is development centres spring up, be organised, where we can recruit nine, ten, 11-year-olds and give them a chance to practise their techniques."

 

Return to granny rule, says big Jack

former ireland soccer manager

By Brendan O’Brien
THE FAI needs to reactivate its interest in the ‘granny’ rule if Ireland are to recover the ground lost in the last two qualifying campaigns for major championships, according to former manager Jack Charlton.

The World Cup winner, in Dublin to promote the DVD ‘Jack Charlton - the Irish Years’, an era when the Geordie routinely capped players with tenuous links to the Republic.

"If you don’t use it you’re daft," said Charlton with typical bluntness yesterday in Dublin. "I got a lot of criticism about the players I brought in but you obey the rules. It is a fact that me and me brother (Bobby) could have played for Scotland because our grandmother was born in Dumfries.

"When I was manager we sent a letter around to all the football clubs and asked them to put it up on the boards, asking players who thought they were qualified and were interested in playing for Ireland to get in touch with the office here in Dublin."

It was in that matter that Charlton and his assistant Maurice Setters tracked down John Aldridge playing at Oxford and the Irish management team caught another lucky break at the Manor Ground when Aldridge informed them that a young midfielder called Ray Houghton had a father born in Donegal.

As it stands, Charlton sees some worrying times ahead for the country he managed for the best part of a decade. While the lack of a truly predatory striker would be top of most people’s Christmas lists, Charlton sees the biggest problem in the engine room.

"Roy Keane is going to be missed. We’ve got to get a few international class midfield players. We used to have them but we don’t now, apart from Damien (Duff) of course. We need somebody coming through who’s going to be an international star, maybe a couple."

Charlton’s old hot seat also needs filling and he believes the new man should be from Ireland or Britain and based in England.

"I think it’s difficult for an Irish manager if they live here. Brian Kerr must have been under a great deal of pressure trying to watch players because it’s a full-on job. You could be over and back three times a week. I lived in the north of England so I covered Scotland and the north and Maurice (Setters) covered the midlands and the south. That was how we found John Aldridge."

Whatever about the immediate future, Ireland’s long-term prospects are being seriously compromised by an alarming drop in technical ability, according to Liam Brady, Arsenal’s Head of Youth Development. He warned yesterday that, technically, Irish youths lag behind their English and European counterparts because of a failure on this island to coach children in the fundamentals from a young age.

"I know there’s great work being done in Ireland because I scout in Ireland, but I have to say that technically, the Irish kids are falling behind," was Brady’s assessment. "The boys coming from Ireland now are not as technically talented as boys from England or Europe. The FAI have to address that.

"It’s something that is evident in our national team. It takes money but the government and the various sporting bodies have got to be persuaded to release the purse strings."

The FAI’s Declan Conroy pointed out yesterday that their Emerging Talent Programme, which is being rolled out by Packie Bonner, is due to commence in 2006. The initiative is aimed at players in their later teens, but Brady has warned the FAI that similar academies abroad cater for eight-year-olds.

"Technique is probably the vital component in sport, whether it’s football or golf," stressed Brady. "Tiger Woods would have got his love of golf and maybe his dedication from his father but people taught him how to play. They taught him his technique. What I would like to see happen in Ireland is development centres spring up, be organised, where we can recruit nine, ten, 11-year-olds and give them a chance to practise their techniques."

 

Return to granny rule, says big Jack

former ireland soccer manager

By Brendan O’Brien
THE FAI needs to reactivate its interest in the ‘granny’ rule if Ireland are to recover the ground lost in the last two qualifying campaigns for major championships, according to former manager Jack Charlton.

The World Cup winner, in Dublin to promote the DVD ‘Jack Charlton - the Irish Years’, an era when the Geordie routinely capped players with tenuous links to the Republic.

"If you don’t use it you’re daft," said Charlton with typical bluntness yesterday in Dublin. "I got a lot of criticism about the players I brought in but you obey the rules. It is a fact that me and me brother (Bobby) could have played for Scotland because our grandmother was born in Dumfries.

"When I was manager we sent a letter around to all the football clubs and asked them to put it up on the boards, asking players who thought they were qualified and were interested in playing for Ireland to get in touch with the office here in Dublin."

It was in that matter that Charlton and his assistant Maurice Setters tracked down John Aldridge playing at Oxford and the Irish management team caught another lucky break at the Manor Ground when Aldridge informed them that a young midfielder called Ray Houghton had a father born in Donegal.

As it stands, Charlton sees some worrying times ahead for the country he managed for the best part of a decade. While the lack of a truly predatory striker would be top of most people’s Christmas lists, Charlton sees the biggest problem in the engine room.

"Roy Keane is going to be missed. We’ve got to get a few international class midfield players. We used to have them but we don’t now, apart from Damien (Duff) of course. We need somebody coming through who’s going to be an international star, maybe a couple."

Charlton’s old hot seat also needs filling and he believes the new man should be from Ireland or Britain and based in England.

"I think it’s difficult for an Irish manager if they live here. Brian Kerr must have been under a great deal of pressure trying to watch players because it’s a full-on job. You could be over and back three times a week. I lived in the north of England so I covered Scotland and the north and Maurice (Setters) covered the midlands and the south. That was how we found John Aldridge."

Whatever about the immediate future, Ireland’s long-term prospects are being seriously compromised by an alarming drop in technical ability, according to Liam Brady, Arsenal’s Head of Youth Development. He warned yesterday that, technically, Irish youths lag behind their English and European counterparts because of a failure on this island to coach children in the fundamentals from a young age.

"I know there’s great work being done in Ireland because I scout in Ireland, but I have to say that technically, the Irish kids are falling behind," was Brady’s assessment. "The boys coming from Ireland now are not as technically talented as boys from England or Europe. The FAI have to address that.

"It’s something that is evident in our national team. It takes money but the government and the various sporting bodies have got to be persuaded to release the purse strings."

The FAI’s Declan Conroy pointed out yesterday that their Emerging Talent Programme, which is being rolled out by Packie Bonner, is due to commence in 2006. The initiative is aimed at players in their later teens, but Brady has warned the FAI that similar academies abroad cater for eight-year-olds.

"Technique is probably the vital component in sport, whether it’s football or golf," stressed Brady. "Tiger Woods would have got his love of golf and maybe his dedication from his father but people taught him how to play. They taught him his technique. What I would like to see happen in Ireland is development centres spring up, be organised, where we can recruit nine, ten, 11-year-olds and give them a chance to practise their techniques."

 

Return to granny rule, says big Jack

former ireland soccer manager

By Brendan O’Brien
THE FAI needs to reactivate its interest in the ‘granny’ rule if Ireland are to recover the ground lost in the last two qualifying campaigns for major championships, according to former manager Jack Charlton.

The World Cup winner, in Dublin to promote the DVD ‘Jack Charlton - the Irish Years’, an era when the Geordie routinely capped players with tenuous links to the Republic.

"If you don’t use it you’re daft," said Charlton with typical bluntness yesterday in Dublin. "I got a lot of criticism about the players I brought in but you obey the rules. It is a fact that me and me brother (Bobby) could have played for Scotland because our grandmother was born in Dumfries.

"When I was manager we sent a letter around to all the football clubs and asked them to put it up on the boards, asking players who thought they were qualified and were interested in playing for Ireland to get in touch with the office here in Dublin."

It was in that matter that Charlton and his assistant Maurice Setters tracked down John Aldridge playing at Oxford and the Irish management team caught another lucky break at the Manor Ground when Aldridge informed them that a young midfielder called Ray Houghton had a father born in Donegal.

As it stands, Charlton sees some worrying times ahead for the country he managed for the best part of a decade. While the lack of a truly predatory striker would be top of most people’s Christmas lists, Charlton sees the biggest problem in the engine room.

"Roy Keane is going to be missed. We’ve got to get a few international class midfield players. We used to have them but we don’t now, apart from Damien (Duff) of course. We need somebody coming through who’s going to be an international star, maybe a couple."

Charlton’s old hot seat also needs filling and he believes the new man should be from Ireland or Britain and based in England.

"I think it’s difficult for an Irish manager if they live here. Brian Kerr must have been under a great deal of pressure trying to watch players because it’s a full-on job. You could be over and back three times a week. I lived in the north of England so I covered Scotland and the north and Maurice (Setters) covered the midlands and the south. That was how we found John Aldridge."

Whatever about the immediate future, Ireland’s long-term prospects are being seriously compromised by an alarming drop in technical ability, according to Liam Brady, Arsenal’s Head of Youth Development. He warned yesterday that, technically, Irish youths lag behind their English and European counterparts because of a failure on this island to coach children in the fundamentals from a young age.

"I know there’s great work being done in Ireland because I scout in Ireland, but I have to say that technically, the Irish kids are falling behind," was Brady’s assessment. "The boys coming from Ireland now are not as technically talented as boys from England or Europe. The FAI have to address that.

"It’s something that is evident in our national team. It takes money but the government and the various sporting bodies have got to be persuaded to release the purse strings."

The FAI’s Declan Conroy pointed out yesterday that their Emerging Talent Programme, which is being rolled out by Packie Bonner, is due to commence in 2006. The initiative is aimed at players in their later teens, but Brady has warned the FAI that similar academies abroad cater for eight-year-olds.

"Technique is probably the vital component in sport, whether it’s football or golf," stressed Brady. "Tiger Woods would have got his love of golf and maybe his dedication from his father but people taught him how to play. They taught him his technique. What I would like to see happen in Ireland is development centres spring up, be organised, where we can recruit nine, ten, 11-year-olds and give them a chance to practise their techniques."

 

Return to granny rule, says big Jack

former ireland soccer manager

By Brendan O’Brien
THE FAI needs to reactivate its interest in the ‘granny’ rule if Ireland are to recover the ground lost in the last two qualifying campaigns for major championships, according to former manager Jack Charlton.

The World Cup winner, in Dublin to promote the DVD ‘Jack Charlton - the Irish Years’, an era when the Geordie routinely capped players with tenuous links to the Republic.

"If you don’t use it you’re daft," said Charlton with typical bluntness yesterday in Dublin. "I got a lot of criticism about the players I brought in but you obey the rules. It is a fact that me and me brother (Bobby) could have played for Scotland because our grandmother was born in Dumfries.

"When I was manager we sent a letter around to all the football clubs and asked them to put it up on the boards, asking players who thought they were qualified and were interested in playing for Ireland to get in touch with the office here in Dublin."

It was in that matter that Charlton and his assistant Maurice Setters tracked down John Aldridge playing at Oxford and the Irish management team caught another lucky break at the Manor Ground when Aldridge informed them that a young midfielder called Ray Houghton had a father born in Donegal.

As it stands, Charlton sees some worrying times ahead for the country he managed for the best part of a decade. While the lack of a truly predatory striker would be top of most people’s Christmas lists, Charlton sees the biggest problem in the engine room.

"Roy Keane is going to be missed. We’ve got to get a few international class midfield players. We used to have them but we don’t now, apart from Damien (Duff) of course. We need somebody coming through who’s going to be an international star, maybe a couple."

Charlton’s old hot seat also needs filling and he believes the new man should be from Ireland or Britain and based in England.

"I think it’s difficult for an Irish manager if they live here. Brian Kerr must have been under a great deal of pressure trying to watch players because it’s a full-on job. You could be over and back three times a week. I lived in the north of England so I covered Scotland and the north and Maurice (Setters) covered the midlands and the south. That was how we found John Aldridge."

Whatever about the immediate future, Ireland’s long-term prospects are being seriously compromised by an alarming drop in technical ability, according to Liam Brady, Arsenal’s Head of Youth Development. He warned yesterday that, technically, Irish youths lag behind their English and European counterparts because of a failure on this island to coach children in the fundamentals from a young age.

"I know there’s great work being done in Ireland because I scout in Ireland, but I have to say that technically, the Irish kids are falling behind," was Brady’s assessment. "The boys coming from Ireland now are not as technically talented as boys from England or Europe. The FAI have to address that.

"It’s something that is evident in our national team. It takes money but the government and the various sporting bodies have got to be persuaded to release the purse strings."

The FAI’s Declan Conroy pointed out yesterday that their Emerging Talent Programme, which is being rolled out by Packie Bonner, is due to commence in 2006. The initiative is aimed at players in their later teens, but Brady has warned the FAI that similar academies abroad cater for eight-year-olds.

"Technique is probably the vital component in sport, whether it’s football or golf," stressed Brady. "Tiger Woods would have got his love of golf and maybe his dedication from his father but people taught him how to play. They taught him his technique. What I would like to see happen in Ireland is development centres spring up, be organised, where we can recruit nine, ten, 11-year-olds and give them a chance to practise their techniques."