You are viewing the content for Thursday 9 October 2003

Meaney has Midas touch as Rockies seek treble

Blackrock hurlers

By Therese O’Callaghan

WITH back-to-back titles over the last two years and another from four years ago, it already appears to be a golden era for Blackrock centre forward Liam Meaney.

Since joining the club in '99, at a time when he thought his hurling career had ended, the former Bishopstown player has clicked back into winning gear.

While the Rockies triumphs to date have left no doubt about their championship pedigree, he has seen at first hand the standards needed to be a winning side.

"The training and the coaching, as well as the effort in the background, counts hugely. But, talent alone does not take you this far. The guys you play with are your friends. Just as you would always back up your buddy in a tight situation, you would do the same on the pitch. There is a real family atmosphere about the place.

"This is my fifth season with Blackrock. In a way I have got a new lease of life. Back then I was thinking of giving up. I was between houses renting in Ballinlough and Tommy O'Sullivan invited me down to puck around. I did not think too much about it. I trained, I enjoyed it and it just went from there.

"Blackrock were very accommodating. I had a new job and couldn't see myself giving the time or the commitment, but they gave me great support. I played junior and worked my way up.

"A lot of people will say good and bad things about Blackrock, but they have a phenomenal pride in the game going back countless years. There is a level of continuity that maybe isn't there in some of the newer clubs."

The long history can be attributed to a very healthy underage structure. Last year there was success at U12 county level. This season those achievements were transferred to U14. If you visit Church Road on any Saturday morning you will witness up to 200 children learning the skills of the game.

Some instructors are recently retired players who have made it up along the ranks, others not so youthful but anxious that the tradition be passed on.

"Jimmy Brohan is there every Saturday morning. The man played in the '50s and now he is coaching my son at U7. That is brilliant. Small children might not know who he is but their parents do and appreciate it.

"I am involved and it is amazing to see kids as young as three come along. We go up as far as U12 and it is wonderful to see these youngsters out on the greens playing hurling. This is something that we do not see enough of. In lots of areas, it is soccer that is taking over."

Many of these juvenile players will be present on Sunday to watch their heroes, a team that benefited from a successful minor side in '94.

However, they will also be looking at a Newtownshandrum 15 reaping the rewards of tremendous underage victories.

"For a parish of 600 or 700 people they have got to four intermediate finals, won three U21 titles, took their first senior county in 2000 and are appearing in their second senior final in two years. They are a bit like Castlehaven in the football with the small rural club ethos and the great pride in the jersey.

"In a sense they are very similar to ourselves too because they have a huge tradition in their own right. They are an outstanding bunch of fellows and they are all roughly around the same age having come through together."

However, previous encounters will not count. It will be a case of 'cometh the hour, cometh the man.'

Newtownshandrum will return to Páirc Uí Chaoimh in anticipation of rediscovering the form that was so evident three years ago. For Blackrock, you could say, it is becoming an all too familiar setting.

 

Meaney has Midas touch as Rockies seek treble

Blackrock hurlers

By Therese O’Callaghan

WITH back-to-back titles over the last two years and another from four years ago, it already appears to be a golden era for Blackrock centre forward Liam Meaney.

Since joining the club in '99, at a time when he thought his hurling career had ended, the former Bishopstown player has clicked back into winning gear.

While the Rockies triumphs to date have left no doubt about their championship pedigree, he has seen at first hand the standards needed to be a winning side.

"The training and the coaching, as well as the effort in the background, counts hugely. But, talent alone does not take you this far. The guys you play with are your friends. Just as you would always back up your buddy in a tight situation, you would do the same on the pitch. There is a real family atmosphere about the place.

"This is my fifth season with Blackrock. In a way I have got a new lease of life. Back then I was thinking of giving up. I was between houses renting in Ballinlough and Tommy O'Sullivan invited me down to puck around. I did not think too much about it. I trained, I enjoyed it and it just went from there.

"Blackrock were very accommodating. I had a new job and couldn't see myself giving the time or the commitment, but they gave me great support. I played junior and worked my way up.

"A lot of people will say good and bad things about Blackrock, but they have a phenomenal pride in the game going back countless years. There is a level of continuity that maybe isn't there in some of the newer clubs."

The long history can be attributed to a very healthy underage structure. Last year there was success at U12 county level. This season those achievements were transferred to U14. If you visit Church Road on any Saturday morning you will witness up to 200 children learning the skills of the game.

Some instructors are recently retired players who have made it up along the ranks, others not so youthful but anxious that the tradition be passed on.

"Jimmy Brohan is there every Saturday morning. The man played in the '50s and now he is coaching my son at U7. That is brilliant. Small children might not know who he is but their parents do and appreciate it.

"I am involved and it is amazing to see kids as young as three come along. We go up as far as U12 and it is wonderful to see these youngsters out on the greens playing hurling. This is something that we do not see enough of. In lots of areas, it is soccer that is taking over."

Many of these juvenile players will be present on Sunday to watch their heroes, a team that benefited from a successful minor side in '94.

However, they will also be looking at a Newtownshandrum 15 reaping the rewards of tremendous underage victories.

"For a parish of 600 or 700 people they have got to four intermediate finals, won three U21 titles, took their first senior county in 2000 and are appearing in their second senior final in two years. They are a bit like Castlehaven in the football with the small rural club ethos and the great pride in the jersey.

"In a sense they are very similar to ourselves too because they have a huge tradition in their own right. They are an outstanding bunch of fellows and they are all roughly around the same age having come through together."

However, previous encounters will not count. It will be a case of 'cometh the hour, cometh the man.'

Newtownshandrum will return to Páirc Uí Chaoimh in anticipation of rediscovering the form that was so evident three years ago. For Blackrock, you could say, it is becoming an all too familiar setting.

 

Meaney has Midas touch as Rockies seek treble

Blackrock hurlers

By Therese O’Callaghan

WITH back-to-back titles over the last two years and another from four years ago, it already appears to be a golden era for Blackrock centre forward Liam Meaney.

Since joining the club in '99, at a time when he thought his hurling career had ended, the former Bishopstown player has clicked back into winning gear.

While the Rockies triumphs to date have left no doubt about their championship pedigree, he has seen at first hand the standards needed to be a winning side.

"The training and the coaching, as well as the effort in the background, counts hugely. But, talent alone does not take you this far. The guys you play with are your friends. Just as you would always back up your buddy in a tight situation, you would do the same on the pitch. There is a real family atmosphere about the place.

"This is my fifth season with Blackrock. In a way I have got a new lease of life. Back then I was thinking of giving up. I was between houses renting in Ballinlough and Tommy O'Sullivan invited me down to puck around. I did not think too much about it. I trained, I enjoyed it and it just went from there.

"Blackrock were very accommodating. I had a new job and couldn't see myself giving the time or the commitment, but they gave me great support. I played junior and worked my way up.

"A lot of people will say good and bad things about Blackrock, but they have a phenomenal pride in the game going back countless years. There is a level of continuity that maybe isn't there in some of the newer clubs."

The long history can be attributed to a very healthy underage structure. Last year there was success at U12 county level. This season those achievements were transferred to U14. If you visit Church Road on any Saturday morning you will witness up to 200 children learning the skills of the game.

Some instructors are recently retired players who have made it up along the ranks, others not so youthful but anxious that the tradition be passed on.

"Jimmy Brohan is there every Saturday morning. The man played in the '50s and now he is coaching my son at U7. That is brilliant. Small children might not know who he is but their parents do and appreciate it.

"I am involved and it is amazing to see kids as young as three come along. We go up as far as U12 and it is wonderful to see these youngsters out on the greens playing hurling. This is something that we do not see enough of. In lots of areas, it is soccer that is taking over."

Many of these juvenile players will be present on Sunday to watch their heroes, a team that benefited from a successful minor side in '94.

However, they will also be looking at a Newtownshandrum 15 reaping the rewards of tremendous underage victories.

"For a parish of 600 or 700 people they have got to four intermediate finals, won three U21 titles, took their first senior county in 2000 and are appearing in their second senior final in two years. They are a bit like Castlehaven in the football with the small rural club ethos and the great pride in the jersey.

"In a sense they are very similar to ourselves too because they have a huge tradition in their own right. They are an outstanding bunch of fellows and they are all roughly around the same age having come through together."

However, previous encounters will not count. It will be a case of 'cometh the hour, cometh the man.'

Newtownshandrum will return to Páirc Uí Chaoimh in anticipation of rediscovering the form that was so evident three years ago. For Blackrock, you could say, it is becoming an all too familiar setting.

 

Meaney has Midas touch as Rockies seek treble

Blackrock hurlers

By Therese O’Callaghan

WITH back-to-back titles over the last two years and another from four years ago, it already appears to be a golden era for Blackrock centre forward Liam Meaney.

Since joining the club in '99, at a time when he thought his hurling career had ended, the former Bishopstown player has clicked back into winning gear.

While the Rockies triumphs to date have left no doubt about their championship pedigree, he has seen at first hand the standards needed to be a winning side.

"The training and the coaching, as well as the effort in the background, counts hugely. But, talent alone does not take you this far. The guys you play with are your friends. Just as you would always back up your buddy in a tight situation, you would do the same on the pitch. There is a real family atmosphere about the place.

"This is my fifth season with Blackrock. In a way I have got a new lease of life. Back then I was thinking of giving up. I was between houses renting in Ballinlough and Tommy O'Sullivan invited me down to puck around. I did not think too much about it. I trained, I enjoyed it and it just went from there.

"Blackrock were very accommodating. I had a new job and couldn't see myself giving the time or the commitment, but they gave me great support. I played junior and worked my way up.

"A lot of people will say good and bad things about Blackrock, but they have a phenomenal pride in the game going back countless years. There is a level of continuity that maybe isn't there in some of the newer clubs."

The long history can be attributed to a very healthy underage structure. Last year there was success at U12 county level. This season those achievements were transferred to U14. If you visit Church Road on any Saturday morning you will witness up to 200 children learning the skills of the game.

Some instructors are recently retired players who have made it up along the ranks, others not so youthful but anxious that the tradition be passed on.

"Jimmy Brohan is there every Saturday morning. The man played in the '50s and now he is coaching my son at U7. That is brilliant. Small children might not know who he is but their parents do and appreciate it.

"I am involved and it is amazing to see kids as young as three come along. We go up as far as U12 and it is wonderful to see these youngsters out on the greens playing hurling. This is something that we do not see enough of. In lots of areas, it is soccer that is taking over."

Many of these juvenile players will be present on Sunday to watch their heroes, a team that benefited from a successful minor side in '94.

However, they will also be looking at a Newtownshandrum 15 reaping the rewards of tremendous underage victories.

"For a parish of 600 or 700 people they have got to four intermediate finals, won three U21 titles, took their first senior county in 2000 and are appearing in their second senior final in two years. They are a bit like Castlehaven in the football with the small rural club ethos and the great pride in the jersey.

"In a sense they are very similar to ourselves too because they have a huge tradition in their own right. They are an outstanding bunch of fellows and they are all roughly around the same age having come through together."

However, previous encounters will not count. It will be a case of 'cometh the hour, cometh the man.'

Newtownshandrum will return to Páirc Uí Chaoimh in anticipation of rediscovering the form that was so evident three years ago. For Blackrock, you could say, it is becoming an all too familiar setting.

 

Meaney has Midas touch as Rockies seek treble

Blackrock hurlers

By Therese O’Callaghan

WITH back-to-back titles over the last two years and another from four years ago, it already appears to be a golden era for Blackrock centre forward Liam Meaney.

Since joining the club in '99, at a time when he thought his hurling career had ended, the former Bishopstown player has clicked back into winning gear.

While the Rockies triumphs to date have left no doubt about their championship pedigree, he has seen at first hand the standards needed to be a winning side.

"The training and the coaching, as well as the effort in the background, counts hugely. But, talent alone does not take you this far. The guys you play with are your friends. Just as you would always back up your buddy in a tight situation, you would do the same on the pitch. There is a real family atmosphere about the place.

"This is my fifth season with Blackrock. In a way I have got a new lease of life. Back then I was thinking of giving up. I was between houses renting in Ballinlough and Tommy O'Sullivan invited me down to puck around. I did not think too much about it. I trained, I enjoyed it and it just went from there.

"Blackrock were very accommodating. I had a new job and couldn't see myself giving the time or the commitment, but they gave me great support. I played junior and worked my way up.

"A lot of people will say good and bad things about Blackrock, but they have a phenomenal pride in the game going back countless years. There is a level of continuity that maybe isn't there in some of the newer clubs."

The long history can be attributed to a very healthy underage structure. Last year there was success at U12 county level. This season those achievements were transferred to U14. If you visit Church Road on any Saturday morning you will witness up to 200 children learning the skills of the game.

Some instructors are recently retired players who have made it up along the ranks, others not so youthful but anxious that the tradition be passed on.

"Jimmy Brohan is there every Saturday morning. The man played in the '50s and now he is coaching my son at U7. That is brilliant. Small children might not know who he is but their parents do and appreciate it.

"I am involved and it is amazing to see kids as young as three come along. We go up as far as U12 and it is wonderful to see these youngsters out on the greens playing hurling. This is something that we do not see enough of. In lots of areas, it is soccer that is taking over."

Many of these juvenile players will be present on Sunday to watch their heroes, a team that benefited from a successful minor side in '94.

However, they will also be looking at a Newtownshandrum 15 reaping the rewards of tremendous underage victories.

"For a parish of 600 or 700 people they have got to four intermediate finals, won three U21 titles, took their first senior county in 2000 and are appearing in their second senior final in two years. They are a bit like Castlehaven in the football with the small rural club ethos and the great pride in the jersey.

"In a sense they are very similar to ourselves too because they have a huge tradition in their own right. They are an outstanding bunch of fellows and they are all roughly around the same age having come through together."

However, previous encounters will not count. It will be a case of 'cometh the hour, cometh the man.'

Newtownshandrum will return to Páirc Uí Chaoimh in anticipation of rediscovering the form that was so evident three years ago. For Blackrock, you could say, it is becoming an all too familiar setting.