You are viewing the content for Saturday 7 June 2003

Dons hitman Connolly still has time on his side

David Connolly

By Bill George
DAVID CONNOLLY was top-scorer among the Irish internationals in England last season with 24 goals in 28 games for Wimbledon, but he is honest enough to accept his goals at club level will not win him a regular place with Ireland — no matter how many he scores.

The challenge he faces on a recurring basis with Ireland is huge for it is extremely difficult to try and influence an international match in a relatively short time as substitute.

Such a role breeds frustration, of course, but the satisfaction of being a regular part of a successful international squad, the achievement of winning 36 caps with Ireland and of scoring eight goals, offer some compensation.

Connolly was first capped by Mick McCarthy, against Portugal at Lansdowne Road in May 1996.

In every sense then, he is an experienced international but he is only 26. He celebrated his birthday yesterday.

His attitude to his enduring role as substitute was probably explained when, earlier this week, he said:

"The players we've got are so good you can't expect to play at all. Robbie (Keane) and Damien (Duff) have done ever so well up front and why should you dislodge them? You're not talking about average players here, you're talking top drawer."

Connolly looked set to climb to the top as well when he first burst onto the international scene.

His exploits as a teenager at club level and with Ireland led to a move to Feyenoord where, for a while, he was the top earner in the Dutch League.

But it rebounded when the club changed managers. Now his club career has hit a good streak and he must come to terms with the fact Wimbledon are struggling with liquidation.

In spite of his best efforts, it seems, life will continue to be difficult for him.

His flow of goals last season was obviously helped by his happy partnership with Neil Shipperley, and he also highlighted his personal feeling of well-being when he said:

"Since I came back to England it was my best season, and it was just a shame that my goals didn't carry the team higher up the table. But there were some positives to take out of the season.

He had a simple explanation for his club success.

"The secret is probably down to a lot of hard work and with good players around you. I'm a little disappointed I'm not the league's top scorer but I got 24 and I'm happy enough with that."

The financial problems that beset Wimbledon stemmed from their lack of support in their temporary headquarters and the lack of fans also impacted on performances in his view.

Interestingly, manager Brian Kerr paired Connolly with Robbie Keane when he introduced the new formation against Norway with Damien Duff playing behind the two strikers.

Perhaps his busy all-round contribution to Wimbledon games made him first-choice to fit the new system?

Connolly has not received the most enthusiastic support from the Irish fans or, indeed, the Irish media, but his honest effort and willingness to make sacrifices for the cause are beyond doubt.

"Every Saturday for my club I have to do a bit of two roles with the system we play. I have to drop off and I have to play on the shoulder of the last defender at times, and that's fine with me, I'm comfortable with that.

"Whatever role you're asked to do for Ireland you do it."

Connolly has a wealth of international experience behind him, but just as it has taken him a while to find a club and a team where he is happy and productive, it could be that his best days for Ireland are still ahead.

At 26 years and one day old he has time on his side.

 

Dons hitman Connolly still has time on his side

David Connolly

By Bill George
DAVID CONNOLLY was top-scorer among the Irish internationals in England last season with 24 goals in 28 games for Wimbledon, but he is honest enough to accept his goals at club level will not win him a regular place with Ireland — no matter how many he scores.

The challenge he faces on a recurring basis with Ireland is huge for it is extremely difficult to try and influence an international match in a relatively short time as substitute.

Such a role breeds frustration, of course, but the satisfaction of being a regular part of a successful international squad, the achievement of winning 36 caps with Ireland and of scoring eight goals, offer some compensation.

Connolly was first capped by Mick McCarthy, against Portugal at Lansdowne Road in May 1996.

In every sense then, he is an experienced international but he is only 26. He celebrated his birthday yesterday.

His attitude to his enduring role as substitute was probably explained when, earlier this week, he said:

"The players we've got are so good you can't expect to play at all. Robbie (Keane) and Damien (Duff) have done ever so well up front and why should you dislodge them? You're not talking about average players here, you're talking top drawer."

Connolly looked set to climb to the top as well when he first burst onto the international scene.

His exploits as a teenager at club level and with Ireland led to a move to Feyenoord where, for a while, he was the top earner in the Dutch League.

But it rebounded when the club changed managers. Now his club career has hit a good streak and he must come to terms with the fact Wimbledon are struggling with liquidation.

In spite of his best efforts, it seems, life will continue to be difficult for him.

His flow of goals last season was obviously helped by his happy partnership with Neil Shipperley, and he also highlighted his personal feeling of well-being when he said:

"Since I came back to England it was my best season, and it was just a shame that my goals didn't carry the team higher up the table. But there were some positives to take out of the season.

He had a simple explanation for his club success.

"The secret is probably down to a lot of hard work and with good players around you. I'm a little disappointed I'm not the league's top scorer but I got 24 and I'm happy enough with that."

The financial problems that beset Wimbledon stemmed from their lack of support in their temporary headquarters and the lack of fans also impacted on performances in his view.

Interestingly, manager Brian Kerr paired Connolly with Robbie Keane when he introduced the new formation against Norway with Damien Duff playing behind the two strikers.

Perhaps his busy all-round contribution to Wimbledon games made him first-choice to fit the new system?

Connolly has not received the most enthusiastic support from the Irish fans or, indeed, the Irish media, but his honest effort and willingness to make sacrifices for the cause are beyond doubt.

"Every Saturday for my club I have to do a bit of two roles with the system we play. I have to drop off and I have to play on the shoulder of the last defender at times, and that's fine with me, I'm comfortable with that.

"Whatever role you're asked to do for Ireland you do it."

Connolly has a wealth of international experience behind him, but just as it has taken him a while to find a club and a team where he is happy and productive, it could be that his best days for Ireland are still ahead.

At 26 years and one day old he has time on his side.

 

Dons hitman Connolly still has time on his side

David Connolly

By Bill George
DAVID CONNOLLY was top-scorer among the Irish internationals in England last season with 24 goals in 28 games for Wimbledon, but he is honest enough to accept his goals at club level will not win him a regular place with Ireland — no matter how many he scores.

The challenge he faces on a recurring basis with Ireland is huge for it is extremely difficult to try and influence an international match in a relatively short time as substitute.

Such a role breeds frustration, of course, but the satisfaction of being a regular part of a successful international squad, the achievement of winning 36 caps with Ireland and of scoring eight goals, offer some compensation.

Connolly was first capped by Mick McCarthy, against Portugal at Lansdowne Road in May 1996.

In every sense then, he is an experienced international but he is only 26. He celebrated his birthday yesterday.

His attitude to his enduring role as substitute was probably explained when, earlier this week, he said:

"The players we've got are so good you can't expect to play at all. Robbie (Keane) and Damien (Duff) have done ever so well up front and why should you dislodge them? You're not talking about average players here, you're talking top drawer."

Connolly looked set to climb to the top as well when he first burst onto the international scene.

His exploits as a teenager at club level and with Ireland led to a move to Feyenoord where, for a while, he was the top earner in the Dutch League.

But it rebounded when the club changed managers. Now his club career has hit a good streak and he must come to terms with the fact Wimbledon are struggling with liquidation.

In spite of his best efforts, it seems, life will continue to be difficult for him.

His flow of goals last season was obviously helped by his happy partnership with Neil Shipperley, and he also highlighted his personal feeling of well-being when he said:

"Since I came back to England it was my best season, and it was just a shame that my goals didn't carry the team higher up the table. But there were some positives to take out of the season.

He had a simple explanation for his club success.

"The secret is probably down to a lot of hard work and with good players around you. I'm a little disappointed I'm not the league's top scorer but I got 24 and I'm happy enough with that."

The financial problems that beset Wimbledon stemmed from their lack of support in their temporary headquarters and the lack of fans also impacted on performances in his view.

Interestingly, manager Brian Kerr paired Connolly with Robbie Keane when he introduced the new formation against Norway with Damien Duff playing behind the two strikers.

Perhaps his busy all-round contribution to Wimbledon games made him first-choice to fit the new system?

Connolly has not received the most enthusiastic support from the Irish fans or, indeed, the Irish media, but his honest effort and willingness to make sacrifices for the cause are beyond doubt.

"Every Saturday for my club I have to do a bit of two roles with the system we play. I have to drop off and I have to play on the shoulder of the last defender at times, and that's fine with me, I'm comfortable with that.

"Whatever role you're asked to do for Ireland you do it."

Connolly has a wealth of international experience behind him, but just as it has taken him a while to find a club and a team where he is happy and productive, it could be that his best days for Ireland are still ahead.

At 26 years and one day old he has time on his side.

 

Dons hitman Connolly still has time on his side

David Connolly

By Bill George
DAVID CONNOLLY was top-scorer among the Irish internationals in England last season with 24 goals in 28 games for Wimbledon, but he is honest enough to accept his goals at club level will not win him a regular place with Ireland — no matter how many he scores.

The challenge he faces on a recurring basis with Ireland is huge for it is extremely difficult to try and influence an international match in a relatively short time as substitute.

Such a role breeds frustration, of course, but the satisfaction of being a regular part of a successful international squad, the achievement of winning 36 caps with Ireland and of scoring eight goals, offer some compensation.

Connolly was first capped by Mick McCarthy, against Portugal at Lansdowne Road in May 1996.

In every sense then, he is an experienced international but he is only 26. He celebrated his birthday yesterday.

His attitude to his enduring role as substitute was probably explained when, earlier this week, he said:

"The players we've got are so good you can't expect to play at all. Robbie (Keane) and Damien (Duff) have done ever so well up front and why should you dislodge them? You're not talking about average players here, you're talking top drawer."

Connolly looked set to climb to the top as well when he first burst onto the international scene.

His exploits as a teenager at club level and with Ireland led to a move to Feyenoord where, for a while, he was the top earner in the Dutch League.

But it rebounded when the club changed managers. Now his club career has hit a good streak and he must come to terms with the fact Wimbledon are struggling with liquidation.

In spite of his best efforts, it seems, life will continue to be difficult for him.

His flow of goals last season was obviously helped by his happy partnership with Neil Shipperley, and he also highlighted his personal feeling of well-being when he said:

"Since I came back to England it was my best season, and it was just a shame that my goals didn't carry the team higher up the table. But there were some positives to take out of the season.

He had a simple explanation for his club success.

"The secret is probably down to a lot of hard work and with good players around you. I'm a little disappointed I'm not the league's top scorer but I got 24 and I'm happy enough with that."

The financial problems that beset Wimbledon stemmed from their lack of support in their temporary headquarters and the lack of fans also impacted on performances in his view.

Interestingly, manager Brian Kerr paired Connolly with Robbie Keane when he introduced the new formation against Norway with Damien Duff playing behind the two strikers.

Perhaps his busy all-round contribution to Wimbledon games made him first-choice to fit the new system?

Connolly has not received the most enthusiastic support from the Irish fans or, indeed, the Irish media, but his honest effort and willingness to make sacrifices for the cause are beyond doubt.

"Every Saturday for my club I have to do a bit of two roles with the system we play. I have to drop off and I have to play on the shoulder of the last defender at times, and that's fine with me, I'm comfortable with that.

"Whatever role you're asked to do for Ireland you do it."

Connolly has a wealth of international experience behind him, but just as it has taken him a while to find a club and a team where he is happy and productive, it could be that his best days for Ireland are still ahead.

At 26 years and one day old he has time on his side.

 

Dons hitman Connolly still has time on his side

David Connolly

By Bill George
DAVID CONNOLLY was top-scorer among the Irish internationals in England last season with 24 goals in 28 games for Wimbledon, but he is honest enough to accept his goals at club level will not win him a regular place with Ireland — no matter how many he scores.

The challenge he faces on a recurring basis with Ireland is huge for it is extremely difficult to try and influence an international match in a relatively short time as substitute.

Such a role breeds frustration, of course, but the satisfaction of being a regular part of a successful international squad, the achievement of winning 36 caps with Ireland and of scoring eight goals, offer some compensation.

Connolly was first capped by Mick McCarthy, against Portugal at Lansdowne Road in May 1996.

In every sense then, he is an experienced international but he is only 26. He celebrated his birthday yesterday.

His attitude to his enduring role as substitute was probably explained when, earlier this week, he said:

"The players we've got are so good you can't expect to play at all. Robbie (Keane) and Damien (Duff) have done ever so well up front and why should you dislodge them? You're not talking about average players here, you're talking top drawer."

Connolly looked set to climb to the top as well when he first burst onto the international scene.

His exploits as a teenager at club level and with Ireland led to a move to Feyenoord where, for a while, he was the top earner in the Dutch League.

But it rebounded when the club changed managers. Now his club career has hit a good streak and he must come to terms with the fact Wimbledon are struggling with liquidation.

In spite of his best efforts, it seems, life will continue to be difficult for him.

His flow of goals last season was obviously helped by his happy partnership with Neil Shipperley, and he also highlighted his personal feeling of well-being when he said:

"Since I came back to England it was my best season, and it was just a shame that my goals didn't carry the team higher up the table. But there were some positives to take out of the season.

He had a simple explanation for his club success.

"The secret is probably down to a lot of hard work and with good players around you. I'm a little disappointed I'm not the league's top scorer but I got 24 and I'm happy enough with that."

The financial problems that beset Wimbledon stemmed from their lack of support in their temporary headquarters and the lack of fans also impacted on performances in his view.

Interestingly, manager Brian Kerr paired Connolly with Robbie Keane when he introduced the new formation against Norway with Damien Duff playing behind the two strikers.

Perhaps his busy all-round contribution to Wimbledon games made him first-choice to fit the new system?

Connolly has not received the most enthusiastic support from the Irish fans or, indeed, the Irish media, but his honest effort and willingness to make sacrifices for the cause are beyond doubt.

"Every Saturday for my club I have to do a bit of two roles with the system we play. I have to drop off and I have to play on the shoulder of the last defender at times, and that's fine with me, I'm comfortable with that.

"Whatever role you're asked to do for Ireland you do it."

Connolly has a wealth of international experience behind him, but just as it has taken him a while to find a club and a team where he is happy and productive, it could be that his best days for Ireland are still ahead.

At 26 years and one day old he has time on his side.