Tokyo women threaten ‘sex strike’ in protest over Tokyo governor candidate Masuzoe

Women in Tokyo are threatening a sex boycott against any man who votes for the front-runner in this weekend’s gubernatorial election, in protest at his claim that menstruation makes women unfit for government.

Yoichi Masuzoe: Women unfit for cabinet. Picture: Getty

A Twitter campaign group based in the capital calling itself “The association of women who will not have sex with men who vote for (Yoichi) Masuzoe”, has garnered almost 3,000 followers since it launched last week.

While the founders have not identified themselves, in their profile they said: “We have stood up to prevent Mr Masuzoe, who makes such insulting remarks against women...We won’t have sex with men who will vote for Mr Masuzoe.”

Masuzoe, 65, a former political scientist who became a celebrity through TV talk shows, before getting involved in politics in 2001, is widely seen as an establishment figure in a country where gender roles remain very distinct.

He told a men’s magazine it would not be proper to have women at the highest level of government because their menstrual cycle makes them irrational: “Women are not normal when they are having a period... You can’t possibly let them make critical decisions about the country (during their period) such as whether or not to go to war.”

Masuzoe has the backing of the conservative ruling party of hawkish Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and is seen as likely to pip his nearest rival, former prime minister Moriyoshi Hosokawa who is standing on an anti- nuclear platform.

All 16 candidates in the poll are men, with many aged in their 60s or older.

But Masuzoe’s comments about women, as well as other controversial remarks on taxing the elderly, have triggered a backlash.

Another website was launched this week by a group of women also seeking to prevent Masuzoe from becoming Tokyo governor — that site has drawn 75,000 hits per day.

“Masuzoe is an enemy of women... He doesn’t love Japan. He loves only himself,” said one comment on the site, by a woman identifying herself as Etsuko Sato.

Despite high levels of education, many women in Japan leave career jobs when they have children, and social pressures to play the homemaker remain strong.

There are very few women in senior political positions — Abe’s 19-member cabinet has only two — and company boards are overwhelmingly male.

Speaking in Davos last month, Abe pledged that by 2020, 30% of leading positions would be occupied by women. Most independent observers suggest this target is unlikely to be met.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

More in this Section

Spanish police arrest 7 terror suspects

Dogs may boost our understanding of IQ and health link

Bruno: My days of fighting for titles are gone

UK public backs ban on junk food ads


You might also like

Breaking Stories

Protesters clash with Hong Kong riot police in dispute over fish sellers

Leukaemia sufferer Lara Casalotti has found a stem cell donor match after her #match4lara campaign went viral

Lifestyle

MAKING CENTS: Focus on the rate when shopping for a mortgage

Chinese New Year: In the year of the monkey

Share, share alike: How social media has replaced the traditional diary

Thomas Lynch uses the living and the dead to inspire his poetry

More From The Irish Examiner