Swimmer takes on Straits of Florida with no shark cage

Chloe McCardel will battle exposure, swift sea currents, stinging jellyfish, sharp-toothed sharks and her own physical limits when she attempts a record swim today from Cuba to Florida.

The 29-year-old Australian, who is bidding to become the first person to make the 100-mile (161-km) Straits of Florida crossing without the protection of a shark cage, said that the challenge has great allure for top athletes.

“At the moment it’s the most high-profile marathon long-distance swim, and swimmers really want to come here and be the first,” McCardel said. “It’s very important; it’s like winning a gold medal.”

American Diana Nyad and Australian Penny Palfrey have attempted the crossing four times between them since 2011, but each time threw in the towel part way through due to injury, jellyfish stings or strong currents. Australian Susie Maroney did it in 1997, but with a shark cage.

Seated on a terrace at the Hemingway Marina in Havana, a smiling McCardel said she hopes to help bring Cubans and Americans closer by symbolically bridging the gap.

“I would very much love to encourage people to come here as tourists and to engage more with Cuba . . . to promote travel and great relations with Cuba. It’s a very beautiful country, and I feel privileged to have been invited here.”

Most US travel to Cuba is barred under Washington’s 51-year embargo against the island, although Americans are increasingly coming here on legal cultural exchanges and family visits.

The two nations have been at odds since after the 1959 Cuban Revolution ushered in Fidel Castro’s Communist government, leading to decades of mutual suspicion and bad relations between Washington and Havana.

A 32-person support team that includes weather experts and doctors will accompany McCardel on her ocean odyssey, which should last about 55-65 hours if she makes it all the way. Every half-hour she plans to pause to eat and down a half-litre of energy drink to stay hydrated.

Special equipment will include an electromagnetic field in the water around her that is designed to keep sharks at bay.

McCardel, who lives in Melbourne, has been swimming since childhood and also competed in triathlons. According to her website, she has made six solo crossings of the English Channel, two double-crossings in 2010 and 2012 and won the 28.5-mile (46-km) Manhattan Island Marathon Swim in 2010.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

More in this Section

Russia to deploy air defences to Syria base raising threat of conflict with NATO

Away in a manger... newborn left in Christmas nativity scene at New York church

Islamic State claims Tunisia bus attack, body of suspected bomber found

France detects first bird flu outbreak since 2007

You might also like

Breaking Stories

'11 dead' in Dominican Republic bus collision

David Cameron's argument for airstrikes in Syria criticized by Jeremy Corbyn

North and South Korea hold border talks to discuss improved links

France and Russia to co-operate in fight against IS


A question of taste - Cónal Creedon

The first female priest ordained in Ireland discusses the influence of women priests in the Anglican ministry

Get to know all the facts if buying someone a drone for Christmas

Gay Byrne was a canny operator who allowed women be heard

More From The Irish Examiner