Teaching Stem subjects - Rocket science

THERE are two ways that children can be taught science, technology, engineering, and maths: They can be pointed to text books and bored senseless or they can engage with the co-called Stem technologies in an exciting, hands-on manner.

For far too long, Irish education has favoured the first option to the detriment of science teaching and learning, resulting in a deficit of talented and high-skilled Stem workers needed for industry.

That is why exciting initiatives such as the CanSat competition run by the European Space Agency are so important. 

Transition-year students from St Columba’s College in Dublin have taken second place at the 2017 contest in which students are taxed with making a miniature satellite designed to fit in the volume and shape of a soft drink can.

Congratulations to them and to all involved in the International Space University’s Space Studies Program which continues at Cork Institute of Technology until August 25.

Encouraging children to learn about Stem subjects is not rocket science. Or perhaps it is and that’s the beauty of it.

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