Mayo County Council first in country to roll out Too Close for comfort initiative

Mayo County Council is the first in the country to launch the Too Close for comfort initiative, ahead of national bike week.

The local authority has produced an informative booklet, highlighting road signage and the importance of sharing the road.

Road safety officer with Mayo County Council, Noel Gibbons, said, “Frighteningly, four people lost their lives on County Mayo roads in 2016, which is a number we urgently want to address and reduce.”

“Seven of the 10 fatal cycling collisions on roads in the Republic of Ireland in 2016 involved a motorist, and 70% of these collisions happened at high speed in rural areas.”

He said that the initiative is about making sure our roads are safer for everyone.

This type initiative has been successfully rolled out in the UK and has increased driver awareness in identifying cyclists and other vulnerable road users.

"Through initiatives such as this one we want to remind motorists and cyclists how vital it is that they abide by the laws of the road at all times in regard to cyclists and other vulnerable road users, and the potential serious and fatal consequences of not doing so,” Mr Gibbons said.

The booklet will be distributed to the general public in a bid to save lives from Friday June 16.

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