Death of Tommy Keane

A former professional soccer player collapsed and died after playing in an indoor tournament yesterday.

There was widespread shock in Galway last night as news spread of the death of Tommy Keane, who was one of the first players Harry Redknapp signed when he embarked on his career in management.

The 44-year old, who helped Galway United win the FAI Cup in 1991, had participated in an indoor tournament at the Our Lady’s Boys Club centre in Sea Road when he collapsed on the way home.

The father of one was rushed to University Hospital Galway but was pronounced dead. Family and friends were last night comforting his wife Paula and son Tommy Jnr. at their home on Headford Road.

The death is the third to hit the soccer community of Galway city in less than a year.

Yesterday’s tournament was in memory of former player and official Noel Crowley, who died last January, while in February former Irish international Eamonn Deacy, who played for Galway United and Aston Villa, died suddenly aged 53.

Keane had followed in Deacy’s footsteps by forging a career in England after the-then Bournemouth boss Redknapp spotted him as a 15-year-old in the mid-’80s.

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