Watch: This high-spec home is a ‘Belle of Ballincollig’

Most of the homes at Limeworth — whether self-build or otherwise — have deserved their ‘luxury’ description, writes Tommy Barker.

Ballincollig, Cork €745,000

Size: 205 sq m (2,211 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 4 plus attic

Bathrooms: 5

BER: C1

THE road came out to meet Limeworth when it blazed a new trail west of Cork city back in 2004 — and the subsequent existence of the snarl-relieving Ballincollig bypass close to this scheme of more than 30 large detacheds has always helped to underpin its appeal, as well as giving vital ‘breathing space’ to the satellite town itself, just west of Cork city.

In fact, the €85 million piece of road infrastructure (allied to the redevelopment of the Murphy Barracks site) was vital to the maturing of Ballincollig as a satellite town community, allowing employment, services and retail to flourish, and making it a truly accessible commute option for relocaters.

It sort of dates when Limeworth was built too, most of the broadly similar large detached homes were done by the O’Driscoll family — on whose farm land these homes were built.

They sold, back around 2004 in the €600,000s, and a smaller number of sites were offered and sold also, at prices of c€220,000.

That later self-build route was the way that No 14 Limeworth came to be, built by a local contractor Johnny Cummins, done back in ‘boom-y’ times, and while it’s probably fair to say that most Limeworth homes qualified for the tag ‘luxury,’ there’s no disputing the level of finishes and extras that got put into the more bespoke No 14.

Nothing was spared in the spec and the finishes of 14 Limeworth on its serviced site, which was landscaped by Nangles Nurseries, say Norma Healy and Ann O’Mahony of Sherry FitzGerald. 

They describe the 2,200 sq ft home with a further 500 sq ft of attic rooms as “splendid” and “flawless”.

Separate to the main house is a ‘services block’ across a brick-paved back patio from the sun room — garage is too small a word for it. 

It’s been fitted out with a second/spare kitchen or at least a bank of units, so is a handy back-up, multi-function extra space for hobbies, craft, art or heavy duty cookery and housework, with capacious storage units.

Despite the level of finish in the main build, it’s quite a simple block layout internally, with a choice of reception rooms left and right of the entrance hallway. 

Behind is a L-shaped kitchen/diner, some 27’ by 10’, with back up utility, guest loo and teed-off to the garden next is a 140 sq ft sun room, with high, vaulted ceiling and end wall of glass.

Overhead are four bedrooms, one per corner, three of them are en suite, and the master bedroom has a dressing room to boot. 

There’s also a family bathroom at this mid-level, with corner bath.

Floors at the upper two levels are varnised maritime pine, while the stairs to both the first and second floors are Irish oak, with oak skirtings architraves and window boards. 

(Floors in the reception rooms at ground are solid oak also, and each of these rooms has a shining white marble fireplace, described as ‘Church’ marble, from Gowran, Co Kilkenny, suppliers Harding Fireplaces.). 

There are two attic level rooms, but no top floor bathroom.

The kitchen is where the quality has to be seen and felt to be appreciated: it’s by Siematic, with a custom-fired, slightly roughened silicate granite worktops and splash backs, atop very plain Shaker style units and breakfast bar.

The floors are a plain pale tile, lighting is recessed (as in much of the house) and appliances are Neff, Siemens and Miele, including an integrated coffee machine.

Heating is zoned and gas fired, most showers are centrally pumped or powered, windows are by Senator, door locks are high-security and there’s an alarm.

Externally there are well-landscaped grounds with heathers and shrubs, a paved front drive faces the house’s tall central entrance projection, with paved rear patio, garden shed, and that multi-purpose garden room.

Easy proximity back to Bishopstown, the western suburbs, hospitals for medics looking to buy within an easy reach of the CUH, Marymount and more stand to Limeworth’s credit, says Sherry Fitz’s Norma Healy, and while prices here dipped down to the low €500,000s a few years ago, they are back into the high €600,000s and two resales have gone well over €700k in the past year or two.

Would-be buyers at this price level may also have thrown the rule over last Monday’s launch of the first five-new builds out at Earls Well, Waterfall, where Savills released five homes for NAMA which are due for completion later this year. 

Earls Well’s five new-builds were priced from €605,000 to €635,000, for A-rated houses varying from 2,300 sq ft to 2,800 sq ft. All five were reserved within a day or two of launch (as were five 1,700 sq ft new builds at Hazel Hill Maryborough Hill this week, priced at €465,000/€470,000.)

VERDICT: Called after the lime trees at the development’s boundary, Limeworth has proven to be perenially popular for the better-heeled traders up.

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