Trading up




Sundays Well, Cork €349,000

Sq m: 204 (2,200 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 6

Bathrooms: 6

Broadband: Yes

What you see here isn’t what you’ll end up with at St Joseph’s, an elevated three-storey period home up by the top of Buxton Hill in Cork’s Sunday’s Well.

Right now, the 2,200 sq ft south-facing house is laid out in six one-bed units, but almost certainly its next owners will take it back to private residential use, reckons auctioneer Michael O’Donovan of Sherry FitzGerald.

It’s going to need work to get back to the state that it deserves to be in to be enjoyed as a private home, so that will mean lots of ripping out of bed-sit kitchens (six), and reinstating a few appropriate fireplaces.

Also, the way the front door has been enclosed in is a bit of a botch, and needs opening up again to throw some light into the hall — which at least has kept its original tiling.

Positives include car parking to the side of the house on the right while ascending the vertiginous Buxton Hill, and a fairly level, south facing lawn in front of the house.

(For those keen on this Sunday’s Well area, Lisney’s have a 1.17 acre Buxton Hill site suitable for two new homes, guiding €275,000.)

VERDICT: You’ll have work to do at St Joseph’s, but it’s not beyond resuscitating and giving back some grandeur to, so budget for what’s needed and bid accordingly.

Cork city €295,000

Sq m:148 (1,600 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 1

Broadband: Yes

There’s a British army military past (associated with Cork’s Victoria Hospital) and bearing with this upright, limestone end-terrace home of huge character — plus, a real surprise, a 100-ft long back garden, with Elysian tower views through its foliage and trees.

Home to an artist, and packed with original features as well as vibrant art, No 20 Rockboro Road dates to the 1890s and is for sale for the first time in over 20 years via auctioneer Lucy Wolfe, who guides the three-storey, immensely solid home off the Old Blackrock Road at €295,000.

The location is quiet to the front, while the south city link road runs below its west-facing garden end, visually screened and partially muffled by mature growth that includes pines and bamboo. The garden’s a real bonus for those confined to city living, and there’s even off-street parking in front, by a gracious sumac tree.

For pedestrians the just-repainted suspension bridge over the link road is a bonus for swift city access.

No 20’s bare limestone building stones or bones are evident inside and out, and also exposed in part are mellow brick and timbers, yet it all feels warm, and bone dry too.

There’s split-level interlinked reception rooms, a bright kitchen with pantry, four bedrooms, several with dual aspect and city views, and one bathroom on the stair return, with bath.

There’s also a polycarbonate potting shed/drying space by the rear garden.

Wearing its age lightly, No 20’s got space, charm, gas central heating, its windows in front have recently been double glazed, and the many retained and/or salvage features include old stone and tile floors worn smooth by 125 years of footfall.

VERDICT: A city home with soul. Plus super-convenient location, space, parking and gardens. View quickly.

Maryborough, Cork €285,000

Sq m: 130 (1,400 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 3

Broadband: Yes

There’s a pecking order of placement in most housing estates — and, according to Jeremy Murphy, of Jeremy Murphy and Associates, Hunter’s Way is one of the most desired slots in the Maryborough Woods scheme at Douglas, Cork.

The four-bed semi has a great cul-de-sac location, (bollards and bendy football nets are usually put out for play,) and drivers know to slow down too.

The property is the kind of house bought by trader-uppers, or well-heeled first-timers, says Murphy, who adds that usually people within the estate tend to trade up there, hence the placement trend.

Just off Maryborough Hill and the main south ring road, No 13 Hunter’s Way is a walk-in job, with an impeccable finish and plenty of space.

Ground floor rooms include interconnecting sitting and dining rooms and double doors to a lovely patio at the rear, (the garden’s been child-proofed, too).

There’s a long, galley kitchen leading to a dining area overlooking the garden through a picture window.

Units are quality Shaker maple and the layout includes a good utility. Overhead, there are four, fine bedrooms, with master en suite and a sleek, main bathroom.

VERDICT: A quick run-down doesn’t do justice to this great family home.

Skibbereen, Cork €350,000

Sq m: Sq m 205 (2,200 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 4

Broadband: Yes

There’s rolling, folding hills and captivating rural contours in and around Oaklands, a recently-built detached four-bed home on an acre at Kilnaclasha, near Skibbereen.

New to market with Pat Maguire Properties, the high-end dormer ‘traditional meets contemporary’ home has quality finishes.

Three of its four bedrooms are en suite (and one’s got a bath,) with solar panels on the detached lofted garage helping to get the hot water up to speed.

That lofted garage has an open plan upper level, with shower, so can be used for gym or guest use.

Oaklands is only a mile or so north of Skib town, and is pristine, with a good aspect maximised by south-facing patio and a west-facing sun-room, with Veluxes in its vaulted ceilings, says Pat Maguire.

Its two other reception rooms each have solid fuel stoves, with the dining room one raised up in an alcove close to an arch linking back to the kitchen.

Floors are a mix of tiles and timber, doors off the hall are glazed for airiness, and the stairs is in solid walnut.

Its grounds are paddock-fenced along the approach avenue, with room for cars to drive around the house and garage.

VERDICT: Above spec, and handy to Skib.

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