The three different types of psyllium on the market and which one to use

I recently went to purchase some psyllium to help with constipation, but there were three different types available — seeds, powder, and hulls, writes Megan Sheppard.

Which one should I use?

The husks or hulls are what you need to help with constipation — which means that either the powder or the hulls are the most suitable options.

The powder is simply the hulls ground more finely. Some people prefer the finer texture, but you can rest assured that both the powder and hulls will work equally well.

The outer husk of psyllium is preferable since the seed germ contains undesirable oils and tannins.

The indigestible mucilage (active principle) is found both in the whole seed and the husk, which swells when it comes in contact with water.

Psyllium works by creating bulk in the intestines and pulling putrefactive toxins from the sides of the intestinal and colon walls. The resulting stretching action on the intestinal wall also encourages peristaltic movement in the bowel.

What some people don’t realise is that psyllium is not only a fantastic aid for constipation and impacted waste, it can also be used to treat dysentery, irritable bowel, haemorrhoids, chronic diarrhoea, cystitis, and even high cholesterol.

Although most people are familiar with the laxative benefits, This mucilaginous plant is also of great benefit for any detoxification programme, whether it be a general cleanse or a deeper candida elimination protocol.

In their efforts to survive in the colon, candida yeasts produce toxins that can cause many allergic reactions.

Taking psyllium regularly when treating a chronic yeast infection will prevent the systemic absorption of the yeast’s metabolic wastes.

It is extremely important to drink plenty of water with psyllium because it expands significantly.

Ideally, you should take 1-3 teaspoons twice daily (first thing in the morning and last thing at night) mixed well in a large glass of water or fresh fruit/veggie juice.

You will need to drink it immediately as it will form a gelatinous mass in the glass otherwise! Psyllium can be used by men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children, and animals. It can be used as often as you need, and can also be included in or on foods.

A friend recently gave me a bottle of pure lemon essential oil. Apart from smelling lovely and fresh, I was wondering if it had any health benefits to it?

Lemon essential oil is a versatile remedy to have on hand. It has antimicrobial properties, which means that it can be useful in treating the symptoms associated with coughs, colds, ‘flu, bronchitis, and asthma. It also stimulates the production of white blood cells, helping the body to fight off bacteria.

Lemon essential oil can help to reduce the viscosity of blood and break up plaque deposits, making it a great oil for helping to reduce cholesterol.

It also works to tonify the vessels, particularly where broken capillaries, varicose veins, haemorrhoids, and nosebleeds are an issue.

You can use lemon oil in a massage oil base, compress, bath, or balm. It is astringent which means that it may be particularly useful where oily skin is an issue due to the over-production of sebum.

The fact it has anti-bacterial properties means that it is handy in the treatment of acne and boils, plus it can be applied undiluted to warts and
verrucae.

Using the oil in a diffuser or vaporiser can help to repel insects and spiders, plus it is reported to have an uplifting and clarifying effect on the mind.

Lemon essential oil is often used in aromatherapy where clarity without over-stimulation is required, particularly where anxiety and overwhelm are an issue.

Lemon is considered to be a non-toxic and non-irritant oil, however, sensitisation can occur in some individuals.

It is not recommended to use lemon oil topically before exposure to the sun since this can cause mild phototoxicity.


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