Author profile: Life in the fast lane for Irvine Welsh

Irvine Welsh’s new novel, A Decent Ride, follows swaggering taxi driver ‘Juice’ Terry Lawson around Edinburgh. It’s another tale of hard-living in Scotland, even as Welsh mixes with celebrities in the US, writes Richard Fitzpatrick.           

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Book Review: Mollie Cinnamon is Not a Cupcake

A FEW years ago, the writer Sarah Webb was staying in a yurt on Cape Clear Island, off the west Cork coast.

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Book Review: The Moth Snowstorm Nature and Joy

What is the economic value of birdsong, butterflies spring wild flowers, or a rising trout? These are some questions posed in a riveting new book on nature, writes Dick Warner.

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Book Review: Last Night on Earth

JAY has been raised by his mother on a diet of ‘gods, monsters, lambs, virgins and fillums, fillums, fillums.’

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BEGINNER’S PLUCK: Carole Gurnett

As a child, Carole wrote long diary entries and letters to anyone who would reply, and as a teenager she wrote short stories. Some were published, and others shortlisted in competitions. 

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FIRST THOUGHTS: Vargas Llosa fails to reach the heights of past

FOR the first three quarters of this 325-page novel, Peruvian master, Mario Vargas Llosa seems to be spinning, in alternating chapters, two quite separate — albeit thematically similar — yarns.

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Book Review: The Girl Who Couldn’t Stop Arguing

THE key to any good novel is to perfect your main character into someone the reader feels they have got to know. And Melissa Kite hits the nail on the head on that front.

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Book Review: Adeline: A Novel Of Virginia Woolf

SPANNING 1925 to 1941, this richly imagined novel of Virginia Woolf delves deep into her psyche, drawing perhaps too heavily on the biography written by Hermione Lee, which lends it enormous accuracy.

 

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Book Review: The Lost Child

THIS latest work of fiction by the West Indies-born writer and Yale professor is as much a personal journey of discovery as it is a literary gem.

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Children’s Books

You Can’t Take An Elephant On The Bus, by Patricia Cleveland (Bloomsbury; €8.80) Elephant yearns to travel, but trying to board the bus is a definite no! 

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What to watch on TV this week

Nadia: Chasing the Dream TV3, 2.45pm

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What Gerard Barrett and Jack Reynor did next

The dynamic duo of the Kerry director and the Dublin actor continue their climb to the top, writes Padraic Killeen.

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From Disney to desolate Detroit: The rise of Ryan Gosling 

Scathing criticism of his directorial debut hasn’t stopped Ryan Gosling from being proud of his efforts, writes Susan Griffin.

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Kodaline

Scene + Heard: All the latest from the world of showbiz

All the latest news and events from the worlds of music, comedy and film.

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Alan Rickman has gone from Dev to Versailles

Alan Rickman’s latest role as King Louis is another example of his penchant for playing real people, writes Ed Power.

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Alan Kelly, Niamh Prior and Fiona Whyte of Quarryman, a literary journal produced by UCC's creative writing students.

UCC digs up the literary journal, Quarryman

UCC’s renowned literary journal, Quarryman, is being re-launched by the university’s inaugural MA in creative writing class. 

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A question of taste: Michael Twomey

CORK theatre stalwart Michael Twomey was one half of the Chah and Miah duo on 1970s TV show Hall’s Pictorial Weekly. 

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Peter Gowen's The Chronicles of Oggle hits sensitivities in Youghal

ACTOR and writer, Peter Gowen is happy that the tour of his one-man show, The Chronicles of Oggle, is making its way to Cork, but describes feeling “absolutely gutted” that it will not be staged at Youghal’s Mall Arts Centre, where it first premiered two years ago.

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Áine Ryan is the girl who lives down the lane...

WHILE researching female rural stereotypes in Irish theatre, for her dissertation in theatre studies at London’s Goldsmith College, Áine Ryan decided to write her own character “to add to the canon”. This 22-year-old from Tipperary, speaking on the phone from her travels in Vietnam, devised a character and then a play.

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