Cobh plans memorial garden to Titanic

A MEMORIAL garden featuring a large glass wall with all the names of those who boarded the Titanic on her ill-fated journey across the Atlantic is to be built in Cobh to mark the centenary of her sinking.

Cobh Town Council, in conjunction with Cobh Tourism Ltd, is to build the memorial garden at Bishop Roche Park, on the eastern side of the town.

A total of 123 men, women and children boarded the Titanic in April 1912 from Cobh, then known as Queenstown.

That was the supposedly unsinkable giant’s last port of call before she hit an iceberg and sank off the coast of Newfoundland.

Of the 123 who boarded at Queenstown, remarkably 77 survived.

Cobh town clerk Padraig Lynch said the names of all those connected with the harbour town and the liner would be put on the glass wall which will have a large etching of the Titanic as its centre piece.

Mr Lynch said Cobh Town Council would also be working closely with city councils in Belfast, Liverpool, Southampton and Cherbourg — which are all associated with the Titanic — to produce a joint website featuring events planned to commemorate the White Star liner’s sinking.

Cobh is planning to host a number of events next year.

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