Elderly at facility spend most of day in bed, says Hiqa report

A HSE-run facility for older people which is at the centre of court proceedings “appeared institutional and hospital-like”, with some residents spending large parts of the day in bed and eating meals at their bedside, according to a report by health watchdog Hiqa.

The Health Information and Quality Authority also said an allegation of an abusive interaction at St Joseph’s Hospital in Ennis, Co Clare, was recorded in the complaints book but had not been investigated as an incident of abuse, with Hiqa stating it had not been notified as per requirements.

There were three major non-compliances with standards at the 120-bed facility, which at the time of the inspection last August had 80 residents.

In what is understood to be the first case of its kind, the HSE had appealed to the local District Court after Hiqa had earlier made critical observations about the centre and had ordered that it stay closed to new admissions.

However, just last month it was decided that St Joseph’s could remain open to new admissions after the HSE and Hiqa reached an agreement following proceedings at the District Court.

In an inspection report issued yesterday, Hiqa said St Joseph’s Hospital in Ennis “appeared institutional and hospital-like” with residents spending most of their days in bed, with staff acknowledging a lack of privacy for the people living there.

The Hiqa report also lists a number of other issues raised by inspectors, including: No dining room in the Hazel or Alder units, with residents eating all their meals by their bedside; not enough showers and only two assisted showers; a complaint was viewed in the complaints book concerning the disturbance caused in a multi-occupancy room by the aggressive behaviour of a resident.

The inspection was the eighth at the facility and the report issued yesterday stated: “Similar to findings on previous inspections, the premises was found to be significantly non-compliant with regulatory requirements.

The premises did not meet the individual and collective needs of residents in terms of their privacy, personal space, access to dining and communal space, and adequate and accessible sanitary facilities.”

The outcome of last month’s court case was reported locally and TD Dr Michael Harty told The Clare Champion that it was “regrettable” that the HSE had to bring a court appeal to keep the doors of St Joseph’s open.

He said the centre had provided an excellent service but that the failure to accelerate progress at St Joseph’s was one of the reasons he had not voted for Leo Varadkar as Taoiseach.

During the recent court proceedings involving the centre, Clare FM reported comments from senior Hiqa inspector Mary O’Mahony, who told the court: “Isn’t the night very long if you go to bed at 4pm and you are in bed until 8am the next morning?”

Ms O’Mahony said that in one unit at St Joseph’s Hospital it would not be unusual if 18 of the 24 residents were in bed for tea at 4pm or 4.30pm or to have 15 out of 24 residents by their bed for their dinner.

She added: “Their whole life revolves around their bed.”

It was agreed that the HSE would continue to carry out works at the hospital and Judge Patrick Durcan adjourned the case to September 22 to allow the improvement works to take place at the centre.

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