Council to spend €50k on flood defences

Clare County Council will spend some €50,000 on emergency flood defences along a stretch of coastline worst affected by storms earlier this month, but over €2.5m will be required to complete permanent protection measures.

The tiny community of Cloghauninchy near Quilty, was where homes were worst hit by the tidal surges. Many of the 14 homes in the area were flooded with seawater in the middle of the night, with some residents having to be rescued by the coastguard.

The council confirmed emergency flood defence works have commenced amid fears that the same properties are still at risk.

The council will use 1,000 one-tonne bags of rock and sand as an interim flood defence barrier, the cost of which it says it will seek to recoup from any future funding allocation from the Government.

The council is seeking €2,581,250 for permanent coastal protection works over a 800m stretch of coastline at Cloghauninchy as well as repairs to a road, sewage pumping station, and a bridge.

Chair of Cloghauninchy Action Group, Michael Neenan said the news had “given great confidence that this temporary barrier will protect” residents’ homes.

Clare county manager Tom Coughlan said the council had “no option” but to try to safeguard the properties.


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