Corrib gas protestor arrested

SHELL To Sea campaigner Maura Harrington has been arrested again after failing to pay fines she received for offences relating to protests against Shell’s Corrib gas pipeline.

The retired Co Mayo schoolteacher, who went on hunger strike last year, was stopped by gardaí after attending a funeral in her home village yesterday afternoon.

She was brought initially to her local garda station before being sent to Mountjoy Women’s Prison in Dublin, where supporters were planning a protest to mark her arrival last night.

Ms Harrington, 57, was imprisoned for periods of four months, one month and two weeks last year for assaulting a garda, public order offences and failure to comply with an order to pay a €1,000 fine and a €1,000 donation to the Garda Benevolent Fund.

She had also been fined for a public order offence and later received a further fine for a motoring offence. Her husband, Naoise O’Mongain, said last night he was not yet clear which fines exactly her latest arrest related to.

“I took the chance when she was brought to our local station to go home and get her clothes together, so I haven’t seen all the paperwork yet,” he said.

He said he expected she would be detained on this occasion for no longer than a week.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

More in this Section

One in eight A&E admissions result in ‘adverse reaction’

Garda: I was rugby tackled after querying fare in Dublin

PICS: Liss Ard estate in West Cork— yours for €7.5m

Man jumped out Limerick Garda station window in a ‘panic’


You might also like

Breaking Stories

Group of friends collect €66m Euromillions jackpot

Bomb squad defuse device outside house in Monaghan

Gardaí warn INM journalists of threats from criminal gangs in Dublin

Revenue seize €10k of cigarettes and tobacco after searching car

Lifestyle

So what makes a truly romantic marriage proposal?

And now for the ultimate question ... Does true love really exist?

A question of taste - Cork composer Irene Buckley

Love and life after the silence

More From The Irish Examiner