Corrib gas protestor arrested

SHELL To Sea campaigner Maura Harrington has been arrested again after failing to pay fines she received for offences relating to protests against Shell’s Corrib gas pipeline.

The retired Co Mayo schoolteacher, who went on hunger strike last year, was stopped by gardaí after attending a funeral in her home village yesterday afternoon.

She was brought initially to her local garda station before being sent to Mountjoy Women’s Prison in Dublin, where supporters were planning a protest to mark her arrival last night.

Ms Harrington, 57, was imprisoned for periods of four months, one month and two weeks last year for assaulting a garda, public order offences and failure to comply with an order to pay a €1,000 fine and a €1,000 donation to the Garda Benevolent Fund.

She had also been fined for a public order offence and later received a further fine for a motoring offence. Her husband, Naoise O’Mongain, said last night he was not yet clear which fines exactly her latest arrest related to.

“I took the chance when she was brought to our local station to go home and get her clothes together, so I haven’t seen all the paperwork yet,” he said.

He said he expected she would be detained on this occasion for no longer than a week.

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