472,638 homes yet to pay €100 property charge

Owners of more than 470,000 properties have yet to pay the controversial €100 household charge.

The failure or refusal to pay the tax represents a loss of over €47m in tax revenues.

According to figures provided by the Department of the Environment, there are an estimated 472,638 properties still liable for the charge.

Environment Minister Phil Hogan has confirmed the compliance rate stands at 70.84%; 1,125,222 have paid the charge out of estimated 1,620,814 properties that are liable.

The charge has generated €112m in tax for the Government. The household charge is to be replaced by the local property tax this year.

Mr Hogan confirmed 22,954, or 2%, of homes have obtained a waiver and are not liable for the charge.

The highest compliance rate is in the Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council area where there is a 86.55% compliance rate. The second highest rate of compliance is in the Taoiseach’s Mayo constituency where a rate of 79.28% was recorded.

Despite having the second highest compliance rate in the country, Mayo County Council became the first local authority to institute district court proceedings against a number of property owners last year who have not paid the tax.

The figures show that Donegal County Council continues to have the lowest rate of compliance in the country and has not yet reached 60% compliance.


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