See Antarctica as you have never seen it before - with a whale's eye view

Researchers have attached cameras to humpback and minke whales in the Antarctic to understand their lives better – and the resulting videos are beautiful.

Dr Ari Friedlaender, from Oregon State University, is tagging whales to get a picture of what a day in the life of a whale is like – helping them to understand feeding patterns, social lives and other behaviours.

(Charles Littnam/WWF)
(Charles Littnam/WWF)

A video showing footage from these magnificent creatures and their body cameras has been shared by WWF Australia, which is helping to fund the research by Dr Friedlaender and his team.

Don’t worry, the camera doesn’t hurt the whales. The camera and some sensors are attached using a suction cup, which stays on for 24 to 48 hours before they detach, are retrieved and used again.

The footage captured is helping the team to better understand critical feeding areas in the Southern Ocean and the impact of shrinking ice caused by warming sea temperatures.

“We have been able to show that whales spend a great deal of time during the days socialising and resting and then feeding largely throughout the evening and night time,” says Dr Friedlaender.

“We can use this [information] to inform policy and management to protect these whales and their ecosystem.”

Email Updates

Receive our lunchtime briefing straight to your inbox

More in this Section

This guy's awesome flower petal art will soothe and entertain you

Today marks the anniversary of Ireland’s most powerful hashtag, #hometovote

This woman has one of the most disliked YouTube videos of all time - here's what she thinks about it...

LISTEN: Irish musician shares stunning original song highlighting heartbreak of miscarriage


Today's Stories

Guinness World Records not keen on Robbie Keane’s goalscoring exploits

Even locals are refused planning in Kerry

Electronic tag was left on dead inmate

230 ‘gender recognition certificates’ issued since 2015

Lifestyle

Hugh Cornwell says music needs something to lash out against

Why does almost every female character on TV have the same perfect locks?

Pre-eclampsia - the condition that kills 100,000 pregnant women and 500,000 babies every year globally

Gorse fires wreaking havoc on forgotten plants and animals

More From The Irish Examiner